Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build

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Rock Ball

Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #100 on: 7 Jul 2021, 12:52 pm »
Here are more charts from my measurements.

I believe that the low frequency information in the waterfall charts is from road noise, A/C, PC fan, and other ambient noise. 

Left channel without sub.


Left channel with sub.


Right channel without sub.


Right channel with sub.


Left channel impulse chart.


Right channel impulse chart.


You can view the charts in my gallery to see them more clearly.

poseidonsvoice

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Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #101 on: 7 Jul 2021, 01:31 pm »
Rock,

There is some work to be done but you are off to a good start. Where you place treatments and what kinds of treatments you use in your room as it pertains to the dispersion of your speaker can be interpreted through REW, provided you measure properly!

Recommend you read this:

http://www.acousticfrontiers.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/acoustic_measurement_standards.pdf

If you use a laptop on battery, you can eliminate what you feel are “sources of noise” in your measurement. And of course you can measure with the HVAC off as well.

There are specific sections on interpretation of spectrograms, impulse data for reflection points etc…, in the latest guide, download is here:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/51jpnxet3bvew2k/REW%20101%20HTS%20Current%20Version.pdf?dl=1

Good luck!

Best,
Anand.

Rock Ball

Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #102 on: 7 Jul 2021, 01:53 pm »
Thanks Anand!

That is extremely helpful information.  I will study those docs.

EdwardT

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Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #103 on: 7 Jul 2021, 07:05 pm »
Everything about this, the build and the room, is very impressive and wonderful.

Atom666

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Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #104 on: 6 Dec 2021, 08:44 pm »
Hi
 Love the setup and the comments about the open baffle subwoofers. They may be on my Christmas list for next year :D. They would be a perfect match for my Apogees
Andrew

Mikethehunterguy

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Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #105 on: 17 Sep 2022, 11:31 pm »
I must have read this 10 times! I have the NXtremes on the way, and the Triples about to get glued up in the back garage.
I have a question. Did anyone consider the Titebond Hide Glue? I read reports that it has up to 60 minute work time! I have my triple amp boxes under clamp right now, and will be tackling the Triples tomorrow. It seems like the hide glue "wets" quite a bit, but is super forgiving of setup time. Fingers crossed it works well!

Peter J

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Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #106 on: 18 Sep 2022, 01:46 am »
I must have read this 10 times! I have the NXtremes on the way, and the Triples about to get glued up in the back garage.
I have a question. Did anyone consider the Titebond Hide Glue? I read reports that it has up to 60 minute work time! I have my triple amp boxes under clamp right now, and will be tackling the Triples tomorrow. It seems like the hide glue "wets" quite a bit, but is super forgiving of setup time. Fingers crossed it works well!

Assemblies like this are really not what hide glue is intended for. if it were me and I didn’t have access to Titebond Extend I’d be looking at Titebond III. It’s nearly as slow to set and much more useful to a woodworker.
« Last Edit: 18 Sep 2022, 02:52 pm by Peter J »

WGH

Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #107 on: 18 Sep 2022, 05:52 am »
Did anyone consider the Titebond Hide Glue? I read reports that it has up to 60 minute work time! I have my triple amp boxes under clamp right now, and will be tackling the Triples tomorrow. It seems like the hide glue "wets" quite a bit, but is super forgiving of setup time. Fingers crossed it works well!

Please do some test glueups first.

Titebond Hide Glue
http://www.titebond.com/product/glues/9e9995b4-08eb-4fc6-8254-c47daa20f8ed

Open Assembly Time: 10 minutes (70°F./50% RH)
Total Assembly Time: 20-30 minutes (70°F./50%RH)

Titebond Extend
http://www.titebond.com/product/glues/d7c6f86b-93cc-4400-99ed-79f8a75a2e95

Open Assembly Time: 15 minutes (70°F./50%RH)
Total Assembly Time: 20-25 minutes (70°F./50%RH)

The longest set time of any glue except for West Epoxy is Grizzly One. The viscosity is perfect, I don't like the other polyurethane glues on the market, they are too thick. Wet out both surfaces a few times when using on MDF otherwise you will get a starved glue joint. MDF is very porous and keeps absorbing glue.
https://www.grizzlyglue.com/

West Epoxy with Extra Slow Hardener will have a 40-50 minute pot life at 72 degrees F. with a cure state in 6-8 hours. You will need one of the thickeners they sell too.
https://www.westsystem.com/the-105-system/epoxy-resins-hardeners/209-extra-slow-hardener/

Mikethehunterguy

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Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #108 on: 18 Sep 2022, 06:44 pm »
Thank you for the tips! I did end up using the Titebond Hide glue on the amp boxes, and it seemed to work very well. I hadn't seen these replies yet. I also did one of the triples. The glue is a bit runny, but super easy to work after assembly. I may get some Grizzy Glue now, as that seems near perfect. Obviously, these triples are much easier to glue up than my forthcoming NXtremes.
My reasoning behind the hide glue was the information contained in the attached article.

https://www.wwgoa.com/article/measuring-wood-glue-assembly-time/

WGH

Re: Rock Ball's NX-Tremes build
« Reply #109 on: 18 Sep 2022, 08:50 pm »
There is more to know about Tightbond Original, II, and III besides longer set times and the increased waterproofness with a higher number.

Titebond Original is an aliphatic resin
Titebond II is a cross-linking PVA
Titebond III is proprietary polymer

Titebond Original dries the hardest and will not clog sandpaper too much
Titebond II is a little more flexible
Titebond III has a very flexible bond, relatively speaking, the dried glue bead is never totally hard and will seriously clog sandpaper.

Titebond III also has the propensity to produce a raised glue line over time. Sand smooth, finish and 6 months later after a change in seasons you can feel a bump at the glue line. Sand or scrape down the bump, re-finish, and the bump will be back in another 6 months. As the wood moves with humidity changes, so does the glue. A good thing if you want a waterproof joint that will not open up. A bad thing if you want wood joints to stay super smooth. I use Titebond Original for all interior furniture, III is good for cutting boards and places that get wet.

Since I made custom entry doors for a living I needed the longest set time possible along with complete waterproofness. I used to use a resorcinol glue, it combined long assembly times with indestructibility. Gluelam beams made with this glue are still solid 70 years later. Unfortunately resorcinol was discontinued years ago, probably because a main ingredient was formaldehyde.

Polyurethane glue is a good substitute but not as strong, it also degrades in sunlight and extreme exposure. I ran years/decades long exposure tests using project cut-offs. The scraps were hung on a fence behind my shop to see what would happen. The resorcinal glue never failed, the polyurethane eventually did but it took a while. That said, the doors I made using polyurethane glue will still last 500 years.

Epoxy is just as strong as resorcinal, has gap filling properties, set time can be adjusted, can be used below 70°F, a lot messier and needs Acetone for cleanup. Epoxy also degrades in sunlight and a high quality marine paint is needed if exposed to the elements 24/7. An ultraviolet absorbing varnish or coating can be used for occasional exposure to sunlight, like on wood canoes.