For Japanese knife enthusiasts....

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Read 62388 times.

jules

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #40 on: 14 May 2009, 05:21 am »
pas,

Quote
unmistakable heel at the hand end of the blade indicating that considerable material has been sharpened away.

A bit late for a reply I know but this inevitably does happen. Even if it's not pronounced it's a problem with any knife that's supposed to have a convex curved edge because one of the prime uses of this type of blade [there are exceptions] requires that the blade should be able to make contact with the board you're cutting on when you're using a classic cutting action. Even a slight, almost invisible concavity or just flatness leaves a gap, or makes poor contact between the board and the knife.

You can recover this knife by carefully [don't overheat] removing metal from the heel end of the blade until such time as you can form a smooth curve over the length of the blade. The knife will have a bit less depth but work as it should [unless your knuckles hit the board]. To do this, you need an appropriate grinder though you can do it with an ordinary one if you take it in very short burts and allow for cooling.

Sorry kenreau ... for those who only read the last post in a thread, please look above  :D

Jules


TIGHTLIKA

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 1
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #41 on: 27 May 2009, 11:14 pm »
i saw this thread and i just had to post! i love knives and sharpening knives!
I had one Shun. but i didn't realize it was a right handed one till. it felt awkward to cut with till actually looked at it and saw how it was offset. i gave it to my dad and he loves it. I first bought globals which were great. but my wife doesnt give a crap abou tmy knives so she ended up beating the crap out of the edges. i now have the high end Mac knives. a 8" chef, a santoko, and a slicer. these are nice and sharp from the factory. i keep these in a knife roll away from everyone. i am wanting to get that glass hone but i dont remember where it is from or who makes it.

rahimlee54

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 405
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #42 on: 13 Jun 2009, 02:40 pm »
I read this thread some time ago but have just gotten around to posting.  I am in need of my first knife set as well as a sharpening stone set I may give the intro Shuns a try and if I like them move up the line eventually.  What would be a nice starter sharpening set?  I would search the net but I still wouldnt know exactly what I am looking for.

Thanks

BobM

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #43 on: 14 Jul 2009, 12:56 pm »
This thread has been dead for a bit now, but I am now in the market for a smallish (5"-6") blade for my wife. probably a Santoku style with a non-wood handle and a blade material that is easy to maintain (like a stainless).

I've been looking at the Tojiro, which I like the look of and the handle looks comfy. But I've also been intrigued by the Kyocera ceramic blades. Any info on these? They look pretty cool but I'm wondering how you sharpen them when they finally need it? Can you use a basic whetstone/oilstone (Carborundum) or do you need to take them someplace special?

This interest reemerged because my wife had a Cutco rep over last night kiving her the "shpiel". From what I saw these Cutco's looked like an overpriced piecve of crap compared to our Henkels. So I convinced her to look at the Japanese knives instead. The Tojiro is about 1/2 the price of a comperable Cutco and, from what I've read on this thread, looks like a better knife overall.

Thanks,
Bob

tmij

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 121
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #44 on: 14 Jul 2009, 03:00 pm »
Hey Bob,

If you get a chance to be in the city anytime this month, do check out Korin (click below)--



They do have Tojiros and you can also pick up a double sided King or Mizuyama waterstone :D

Best,
Tito

BobM

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #45 on: 16 Jul 2009, 04:17 pm »
Well I walked over to Korin on my lunch hour today (I work downtown NYC) and picked up a knife. Very nice store with some really great looking knives of all styles. There was even a Japanese craftsman in a glass booth shaprning and honing knives. That reminded me of those upscale tobacco shops where someone is rolling cigars.  :lol:

Anyway, I went in looking for a Tojiro - Santoku. The salesman talked me into a Togiharu Inox - Santoku for about $5 more. He said it was a better class of steel and the overall craftsmanship of this manufacturer is one class up from the Tojiro.

So the wife should be happy tonight. I just hope she doesn't find occasion to use it on me - it's damn sharp!

Thanks for the recommendations,
Bob

SET Man

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #46 on: 15 Jul 2010, 03:00 am »
Hey!

    I took a fellow NYAR Raver to Korin store because he's looking for sharpening stone. They are having a knives sale right now so while I was there I couldn't myself and picked this up for a pretty good price...



 A Misono 240mm/9.4in Swedish high carbon steel Gyutou :D 



Japanese made. Hand forged from high carbon Swedish steel. With beautiful dragon engraving on the blade. High carbon knives can be sharpen to a very sharp edge and can hold it sharpness well but prone to rust. As you can see on on the blade here and that was from it short first use on this one. It will eventually develop a patina.... I've seen some old carbon knives with patina and that is OK with me. But if not maintained it will rust.



  I also bought a "Saya" a wooden knife sleeve and a bottle of knives oil (camellia oil) to coat it keep it from rusting.

  I've been using a Korin 210mm/8.2in Western style molybdenum V.G. steel that was giving to me for a while....



   And with larger volume kitchen prep sometime I think a bit bigger knife would be nice. So, I've been looking around for a new knife. At first I was going to go with something like Shun but this Misono caught my eye. At first it was the dragon engraving that got my attention. But the more I read and learn about how high carbon knives are the more I like it. A classic material that can be very sharp. But of course there is the downside, it will stain and if not taking care of it will rust.

  Well, this is my first Misono and high carbon knife. So far it is very nice, light and extremely sharp like a razor!

Take care,
Buddy :thumb:
 

Bemopti123

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #47 on: 15 Jul 2010, 03:36 am »
Handling and using a high end Japanese kitchen knife is an experience in itself.  Of course, after having used to handling it, the newness or rush of cutting fades to a background...until you find yourself in someone else's kitchen and use their $20 special....  Trying to make cuts with a $20 steel blade, usually made in China tearing through food, stretching the food to be made, ripping, ragging through it is something extremely unpleasant after having experienced the feel of a Japanese blade. 

I can clearly see where people might begin to collect knives that they might NEVER, EVER use, especially due to the price or the artistry of it..... Korin has these knives that to me, seem more like sedated mini Samurai swords rather than cooking/prepping instruments. 

If you have NEVER experienced one of these decent knives, you owe it to yourself try one.  Amazing. 

After that outing with Buddy to get my set of sharpening stones and helping him decide on the "dragon" knife, I myself am intrigued with the possibility of using a real molybdenum steel knife even though it is more demanding maintenance wise. 

Paul

Rob Babcock

  • Volunteer
  • Posts: 9131
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #48 on: 15 Jul 2010, 03:49 pm »
Korin does their 15% off deal at least twice per yer and I usually try to pick up something each time they do.  But it's getting to where I don't really want most of the brands they carry; I'd love a Nenox but it's a bit too rich for my blood, and I'm pretty set on Tojiros.  Still it's a great store.  That Misono is a nice peice, and I dig that Korin will sell a saya for nearly any knife they stock.

I'll have to post some pics of a few I haven't posted here yet.   8)

SET Man

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #49 on: 21 Jul 2010, 02:30 am »
Handling and using a high end Japanese kitchen knife is an experience in itself.  Of course, after having used to handling it, the newness or rush of cutting fades to a background...until you find yourself in someone else's kitchen and use their $20 special....  Trying to make cuts with a $20 steel blade, usually made in China tearing through food, stretching the food to be made, ripping, ragging through it is something extremely unpleasant after having experienced the feel of a Japanese blade. 

I can clearly see where people might begin to collect knives that they might NEVER, EVER use, especially due to the price or the artistry of it..... Korin has these knives that to me, seem more like sedated mini Samurai swords rather than cooking/prepping instruments. 

If you have NEVER experienced one of these decent knives, you owe it to yourself try one.  Amazing. 

After that outing with Buddy to get my set of sharpening stones and helping him decide on the "dragon" knife, I myself am intrigued with the possibility of using a real molybdenum steel knife even though it is more demanding maintenance wise. 

Paul

Hey!

   Yup, I know what you mean. Once you used a good knife it is hard to go back to cheap one. Especially if you have to use it almost everyday. With good knife it is much easier to do thing with less effort.... just let the knife do the work. With good sharp knife you don't hack through or saw through things.

   Anyway, it had been a week with my Misono dragon knife and I have to say that I really like it and enjoy using it. It just slice through things smoothly effortlessly. No need to push hard and this help a lot when you have do a big prep job. It is a bit bigger than my old one 210mm/8.2" vs 240mm/9.4" really help too. But it can be awkward in small space. So, in smaller space I still sometime reach for the old 210mm. But I think I'm going to keep the old to be use at home now.

  As for sharpness. I did notice that it had lost the "new out of the box" sharpness to it. But it is still very very sharp. I still don't know how it will be after I sharpen it with stone.

    The knife itself now developing more patina to it. But it is interesting. The downside is that I have to wash and wipe is off after each use unlike the old molybdenum knife that I can just wash and forget.

   Anyway, overall I think it is worth every penny I spent. Sharp, good handling, light ( I know some like heavy knives) and beautiful :D

Take care,
Buddy :thumb:

Pez

  • Industry Contributor
  • Posts: 3384
  • The dispenser of Truth.
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #50 on: 21 Jul 2010, 03:53 am »
My Shun collection.

Actual folded steel.



They are super thin and so wonderful to use. Reminds me I need to sharpen them.

alan m. kafton

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 151
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #51 on: 21 Jul 2010, 09:39 am »
I love my Shun's as well. Even though I cut left-handed, I enjoy the feel of the round/offset handle and the silky feel of the wood itself.

I have a 3.5-inch parer, a 3.5-inch specialty/utility, a 6 inch Santoku (now my primary slicing knife) and recently purchased the 6-inch chef, which for my hand has a wonderful balance. I plan to use this for all my dicing and chiffonade work. I also purchased a wonderful 9-inch slicing knife from an Audio Circle member last year, for special occasions like Thanksgiving, etc.

I looked at the more premium Shun's, but for my level the Classic's are just fine.

alan m. kafton

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 151
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #52 on: 21 Jul 2010, 09:45 am »
I should also mention that all my Shun's were purchased via Williams-Sonoma special promotions at 40% to 50% off. Sweetened the deal, without a doubt.

navi

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 450
  • Gustard x20/DIY amp/Benchmark S500
    • My Instagram
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #53 on: 21 Jul 2010, 09:49 am »


I bought this in Japan last year for around 20,000 yen. I chipped it last year on very hung over morning cracking coconuts with it....... (I don't know why i did it. stupid)
Everybody that has used it love this knife it just slices through anything...... except coconuts.

Ericus Rex

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #54 on: 21 Jul 2010, 11:55 am »
The Shuns aren't actually folded.  The pattern is etched into the blade.  The lit says 'Demascus-like pattern'.  They're great knives none-the-less.  I've got a bunch myself.

Bemopti123

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #55 on: 21 Jul 2010, 01:36 pm »
I think I told my mom to by a Shun, as it was the only high end knife available besides some generic Henckles at a Crate and Barrel in Atlanta.  For sure it cuts well...but what I did not know was that the pattern of folded steel, damascus, as just "imprinted"?  Which makes me wonder whether their line and what follows was made either in the same factory/ with the same process....

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/90131068

The merit of a really well made Japanese chef knife for me is the balance of the overall knife, as well as the quality of the blade materials.  Their blades are not thicker than they ought to be, and they have a sharpness that must be experienced to really know that there are knives like them in existence. 

My beauty is this one here....

http://korin.com/HOT-GY?sc=7&category=120853

Ericus Rex

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #56 on: 21 Jul 2010, 01:49 pm »
True Demascus steels require far more maintenance than Shun thought the mainstream user would accept since they rust more easily.  So they chose a stainless steel and etched the pattern to look more Japanese.  Don't get me wrong, I'm certainly not knocking them.  I don't have the time or patience to properly care for a great folded Japanese knife.  So the Shuns are perfect for me!

SET Man

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #57 on: 21 Jul 2010, 11:12 pm »
The Shuns aren't actually folded.  The pattern is etched into the blade.  The lit says 'Demascus-like pattern'.  They're great knives none-the-less.  I've got a bunch myself.

Hey!

    Well, I think you are partly right. I checked out Shun's website and look like it is true that Shuns are not a "true" damascus knives....

http://www.kershawknives.com/knifetech.php?feature_id=26&brand=shun

   Instead, , look like they using "clad construction" of which use 16-layers of high carbon stainless steel damacus to clad the VG10 steel inner core.

  So, I guess is it really a VG10 steel knives cladded with thin damascus stainless steel.  Still a very good knives. I did considered it until I fell for the classic high carbon steel Misono.

   But I have to admit that I still do have a soft spot for damascus steel knives and might get one someday.

   Hmmm... But I wonder how many "true damascus" chef's knives are out there? :scratch:

Take care,
Buddy :thumb:

Ericus Rex

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #58 on: 21 Jul 2010, 11:50 pm »
Hmmm... But I wonder how many "true damascus" chef's knives are out there? :scratch:

Check out this site:

http://www.japanwoodworker.com/dept.asp?dept_id=13160&s=JapanWoodworker

Daedalus Audio

  • Industry Contributor
  • Posts: 841
    • http://www.daedalusaudio.com
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #59 on: 22 Jul 2010, 12:03 am »
Check out this site:

http://www.japanwoodworker.com/dept.asp?dept_id=13160&s=JapanWoodworker

just saw this thread.  Bob Kramer is the man for Damascus kitchen knives.  he's also a great guy who loves audio (he has a pair of Daedalus & a Modwright KWA150) he's even been to a couple of RMAF with me. I have two of his knives on my sailboat (that's home) and they do very well as far as rust... and as for sharp, after fiver years of daily use they still beat a razor and I haven't touched them to a steel yet!

check him out!

http://www.kramerknives.com/

lou