For Japanese knife enthusiasts....

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Read 62405 times.

goskers

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 408
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #20 on: 3 Feb 2009, 10:09 pm »
What knife do you mention for $30?  The only Deba Hocho knives start at 80 plus.

Thanks.

S Clark

  • Volunteer
  • Posts: 5797
  • measurement? We don't need no stinkin measurement
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #21 on: 3 Feb 2009, 10:22 pm »
The Tosagata knives start under $40 and used to be under $30.  They aren't pretty, but they are hand-made and excellent steel-- harder than Global and any European knife.  I think they are a 63 hardness.  I don't use a steel on mine as it shatters the fine edge- stone and strop.

pjanda1

  • Industry Participant
  • Posts: 85
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #22 on: 3 Feb 2009, 10:31 pm »
My Gyuto is a 240mm Hiromoto HC.  It's a shame they don't seem to be available anymore.  It is an excellent $50 knife.  It's not necessarily the lamination that makes a great Japanese knife.  Regular old carbon steel at the correct temper and profile is wonderful in every area but aesthetics (I actually like the patina).  My wife uses a basic Tojiro Santoku.  Also a great knife.  I bought them both from Japanesechefsknife.com.  They have a great selection and excellent prices.  $7 got them across the Pacific in less than a week.

pj


Rob Babcock

  • Volunteer
  • Posts: 9131
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #23 on: 3 Feb 2009, 11:38 pm »
My Gyuto is a 240mm Hiromoto HC.  It's a shame they don't seem to be available anymore.


They turn up on eBay pretty regularly.  I think there are a couple now.

Stu Pitt

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #24 on: 4 Feb 2009, 12:25 am »
Since it is confession time.  Audio, knives, cooking, wine, and increasingly scuba diving.  Scuba diving offers a plethora of expensive toys for boys.

I have a few Henkels, Sabatier...  When I used to live in Toronto my local department store decided to discontinue Global knives.  75%!  I bought them ALL.  So I have about 10 different Global knives.  I was too stupid to realize that I was buying a right-handed sushi knife - I am left handed.  Anyone interested in a Global sushi knife for a good price?

I am thinking of trying out a good quality Japanese chefs knife.  Something in the $100 to $200 range.  Which one(s) should I try?


I've bought a few more Shun knives.  I couldn't be happier.  They have a chef's knife and santoku on the bottom end of your price range.  If you have a Bed Bath and Beyond near you and get those 20% off coupons in the mail, they'll accept it.  Every store I've seen sells them for the same price, but the 20% coupon makes it sweeter.

bbchem

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #25 on: 4 Feb 2009, 02:01 am »
What knife do you mention for $30?  The only Deba Hocho knives start at 80 plus.

Thanks.

Here is the page its a from Tosagata, my wife cuts pineapple watermelon and coconuts with it and it remains my sharpest knife!
Not pretty or refined but a hell of a bargain for $35!!!

http://www.japanwoodworker.com/dept.asp?dept_id=13198

>>

Stu Pitt

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #26 on: 4 Feb 2009, 02:12 am »
Syrah,

I just realized - Shun knives are are either right handed or left handed.  If you're contemplating one, make sure you get the correct one.

jules

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #27 on: 4 Feb 2009, 11:42 pm »
A delayed comment on steels ...

I find steels useful and practical and if you're using a knife for a period of time on something like slicing meat [or pretty much anything  :)], there's a need to touch the edge up regularly ... as in every few minutes. Most [maybe all] commercial steels come with a very rough surface which can take you back a few steps from what you achieve with a fine stone. Steels should be smoothed off with wet and dry paper of 120 or finer grade. A good steel should look close to dead smooth aside from the fine grooves made by the wet and dry [or other similar]. No doubt this doesn't approach Rob's 30,000 grit or the smoothness produced by a strop but it's streets ahead of a standard finish steel.

Jules

Andrikos

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #28 on: 17 Feb 2009, 06:48 pm »
Can I use this knife for general use?
I mainly chop veggies, some meat slicing.

I'd like a nice slicing/chopping knife I can use for years.
Excuse my ignorance, I'm a complete knife newbie.

http://www.japanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id=11.011.06&dept_id=13169



Syrah

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 569
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #29 on: 19 Feb 2009, 03:55 am »
Thanks Stu Pitt.  Unfortunately I just bought one.  But I don't see any difference on the blade like there is with the one-sided sushi knife.  Is the difference in that ridge in the handle?  My ridge is in the right side of the handle, but that feels fine in my left hand.  Quite a knife!

Lyndon

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #30 on: 19 Feb 2009, 04:39 am »


The Bride: [Japanese] I need Japanese steel.
Hattori Hanzo: [Japanese] Why do you need Japanese steel?
The Bride: [Japanese] I have vermin to kill.
Hattori Hanzo: [English] You must have big rats if you need Hattori Hanzo's steel
 :D
Now you guys got me.  I have to look for my one Japanese knife that my sister bought for me
over in Japan.  I was only using it for vegetables, and misplaced it.  All of you are right, it is wicked
sharp!

Stu Pitt

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #31 on: 20 Feb 2009, 02:04 am »
Thanks Stu Pitt.  Unfortunately I just bought one.  But I don't see any difference on the blade like there is with the one-sided sushi knife.  Is the difference in that ridge in the handle?  My ridge is in the right side of the handle, but that feels fine in my left hand.  Quite a knife!

The only difference is the handle.  I really like mine and plan on buying a few more.  Next for me will be a 5 1/2" Santoku.

Rob Babcock

  • Volunteer
  • Posts: 9131
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #32 on: 9 Mar 2009, 09:58 am »
Several months ago I lent my left-handed GF a right-handed Shun.  She thought the handle worked just fine.  As has been noted the Shun Classics are beveled 50/50, only the handle is different.  Still the left hand versions are generally the same price so just order the one you prefer.

BTW, I have several Shuns and find them to be good knives.

stone deaf

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #33 on: 13 Mar 2009, 05:04 pm »
I have a set of Henckles but most often reach for one of 3 Kyrocera ceramic knives. I bought a set of 3 Eagle ceramic knives to use when I sent the Kyrocera back to have them sharpened once a year but the Eagle knives will barely slice a tomato without bruising it, they are worthless. I have wanted a steel Santoku for a while now just couldn't decide on a brand till now.

SharkyRivethead

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 42
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #34 on: 28 Mar 2009, 12:40 am »
 I have a Shun Blade. It was designed by Ken Onion. It's the 8" Chef's knife. I love this blade. Scared the hell out of me the first time I used it. I have never had anything that sharp before.


I was reading a comment about stones and steels. I thought steels only re-arranged the metal on a blade around. It's good to give it an edge. But after some time you need to use a stone to take off that metal build up.

Syrah

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 569
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #35 on: 28 Mar 2009, 01:15 pm »
This has been confusing me lately too.  I know traditionally that steels hone and stones sharper (i.e. remove metal).  But Global is pretty firm against any steel not made of diamond or ceramic.  I'm not sure why.  Also, it seems that most steels are rough and sharper too.  I know a lot of chefs use steels that are smooth - so strictly for honing.  Should I be honing my Globals and my Shun?  If so with what and how often?

Ericus Rex

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #36 on: 28 Mar 2009, 03:09 pm »
I'm no expert but my understanding is that typical steels put a serated burr on the knife.  After several hones, the knife can no longer get a sufficient burr and needs to be sharpened on a stone.  Then it can be honed many more times before needing stone sharpening again.  I imagine a ceramic/diamond 'steel' will act more like a sharpening stone on the knife and less like a traditional ribbed steel (i.e. it sharpens instead of merely burring).  That could be the reason for Global's recommendation.

How wrong am I on this guys?

pas

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #37 on: 28 Mar 2009, 04:22 pm »
In my experience you're correct.  About 20 years ago I purchased a Zwilling 4star 8' chefs knife and a diamond steel.  It now has that unmistakable heel at the hand end of the blade indicating that considerable material has been sharpened away.  If I had used a traditional steel and a stone only when it didn't hold an edge I suspect that there'd be more knife left after 20 years.

SharkyRivethead

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 42
Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #38 on: 4 Apr 2009, 05:52 pm »
 Just for that reason, that I don't want to loose to much blade over time. I use a fine and ceramic stone. Part of a Spyder Knife sharpening kit I got. The kit it's self is hard getting used too. But in any case I will use my steel on my Shun blade a couple times then use the kit to sherpen it. It might be over kill, but it keeps me from having to take away so much metal. By the way, the steel I use is a J.A. Henckels Fine steel.

kenreau

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #39 on: 14 May 2009, 04:51 am »
...post deleted...
« Last Edit: 21 May 2009, 08:17 pm by kenreau »