For Japanese knife enthusiasts....

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nocrapman

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #80 on: 26 Nov 2010, 04:56 pm »
Wow! This is the last place I expected to see a knife thread!
I am into woodworking and audio, and have been wanting to upgrade my kitchen arsenal for quite a while. Anyone have recommendations for a good blade/s for chopping/dicing veggies and cutting fruits. I will be using a end grain wooden cutting board and have a complete setup for every possible sharpening situation already (from my woodworking shop).
I need something that will not rust easily, as the wife is not so careful with stuff!

turkey

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #81 on: 26 Nov 2010, 05:37 pm »
Wow! This is the last place I expected to see a knife thread!
I am into woodworking and audio, and have been wanting to upgrade my kitchen arsenal for quite a while. Anyone have recommendations for a good blade/s for chopping/dicing veggies and cutting fruits. I will be using a end grain wooden cutting board and have a complete setup for every possible sharpening situation already (from my woodworking shop).
I need something that will not rust easily, as the wife is not so careful with stuff!

For handmade knives, I like Warther's. They're very nice quality and are made in the US out of US materials by US workers paid a good wage. I have several of their knives and besides working well, they have character. :)

http://www.warthercutlery.com


Rob Babcock

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #82 on: 26 Nov 2010, 09:03 pm »
"Damascus steel" and "wootz" are the same thing and they date back more than 2000 years. "Damascus steel" was simply what the Westerners called pattern-welded steel.


Well, historically that's not true.  Damascus dates back quite a ways but there are no records of how it was made.  Wootz steel is a reconstruction that obtains results that are very similar to ancient Damascus, but no one living today really knows for sure it's made the same.

turkey

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #83 on: 26 Nov 2010, 09:33 pm »

Well, historically that's not true.  Damascus dates back quite a ways but there are no records of how it was made.  Wootz steel is a reconstruction that obtains results that are very similar to ancient Damascus, but no one living today really knows for sure it's made the same.

Check your sources. Wootz dates back to at least 300 BCE. Damascus steel was simply the name given to the finished product by Westerners, usually relating to swords.

http://damascus.free.fr/f_damas/f_quest/f_wsteel/indiaw.htm

They were legendary not because of the forge-welding or layering or anything like that, but because they were made of good steel - far better than anything Westerners could make at the time.

Rob Babcock

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #84 on: 27 Nov 2010, 04:26 am »
I've consulted many sources, including a couple of the country's best custom knife makers and a friend with a degree in materials science.  Here we'll have to agree to disagree. :duh: :lol:

SET Man

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #85 on: 27 Nov 2010, 04:41 am »

hahaha, is it passion or obsession?  Men with all the electronics with thousands of volts passing through it or interest in intricate mechanism or with sharp, deadly objects...   :thumb:

Hey!

   Passion or obsession? Maybe? But my excuse is that I'm using knives  for a living :wink:

   Sure I can work and get away with $12 knife. But a good well balances, comfy and sharp of course really make working easier and less strain on my hand. Especially after couple of hours.

    BTW... it had been a little over 4 months now with my Misono and I still love it. It made things easier for me everything from big bulk prep works to fine cut works. It stay sharp pretty long and it easy to sharpen. One of the sous chef at my work use Shun and she asked me to sharpen it for her, I did but I can't seem to get to be as sharp as my carbon steel Misono. Well, let's just say that I am now hooked on carbon steel knives now :D

Take care,
Buddy :thumb:

crowkiller

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #86 on: 3 Dec 2010, 08:05 pm »
I have seen this fellow at several custom knife shows. His stuff is AMAZING & his sharping demos scary!  He is  Murray Carter, he is Canadian and moved to Japan to study under The Yoshimoto clan smiths.  He has since graduated and moved to Oregon, USA.  He is a 17th Generation Yoshimoto Bladesmith and Certified Master Bladesmith.  I just ordered some of his stuff during a sale he had for newsletter subscribers.  Here is a link to his site. 
http://www.cartercutlery.com/

Rob Babcock

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #87 on: 4 Dec 2010, 03:47 am »
Not only is Carter a great knifemaker,he's an amazing sharpener!  He won our "Sharpening Olympics" over at KF.

Rob Babcock

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #88 on: 4 Dec 2010, 03:51 am »
Okay, here's my newest one! I just got a new CarboNext 300mm suji from JCK- EMS dropped it off a couple days ago. I haven't had time to take a pic, so I'll post one from JCK:





300mm Kagayaki CN Sujihiki

The buzz on the interwebz is that the CarboNext is a actually an Ichimonji TKC branded for JCK. This wouldn't be at all unusual; the world of J-knives is an incestuous and convoluted one. For instance, Hattori's HD line is actually manufactured by Ryusen with Hattori San doing the final inspection and hand finishing. An Akifusa can also be purchased as an Ikeda. There are many other examples but you get the picture. A little bird tells me this rumor comes from a source who would know. The kicker is that the only US distributor of the Ichimonji/Kikuichi TKC just lowered his prices by 10-15%...that makes me think we're talking apples and apples here. That made it worth a try.

For those of you who haven't used one the TKC is a remarkable knife. The fit and finish is great and the early Ichimonji ones like mine truly can be considered "lasers." The steel takes a great edge as it's some type of carbon tool steel. It's not stainless but it doesn't stain easily. It will take a patina. Edge retention is superb; time will tell, but it may come close to the Akifusa in that regard. All in all my 240mm TCK is my favorite gyuto.

As I unboxed the 300mm Kagayaki CarboNext it really does look like a TKC. Same handle, same lines, same look. Again, time will tell but it's a nice lookin' piece, especially for $161 delivered. OotB it's not sharp at all. It has a few inches out of twelve that are sharp but overall it's pretty dull- probably the dullest true J-knife I've ever bought. Let me hasten to add that it bothers me not all. Many knives come basically unsharpened. Just check out an Aritsuga sometime. Word from other recent purchasers reinforces this, so if you buy one plan on "opening" it when you get it. I spent two hours on mine tonite, and it wasn't fun. It's no axe but I did feel it needed to be thinned behind the edge. I started with a 120 grit Shapton GlassStone which is a very aggressive stone, but it still took awhile. And I scratched up the left side a bit. Note to self- it doesn't take much of a slip with a 120 grit stone. Oh, well. I didn't bother to buff it out since it's a working knife but I might later on. At any rate, it's not that it's hard to cut the steel, I just wanted to thin it up the edge about 5 mm. That seemed to fix it to my satisfaction. I moved to a 500 grit GlassStone, then polished out the relief bevel on a 2k Naniwa Green Brick. After a rinse in the sink and a trip to a ceramic hone & a balsa strop I hit the stones. I went thru my Choceras- 1k, 2k and 5k. I then hit it with my 8k Naniwa "Snow White" before finishing on the 10k Chocera.

At this point it would fall thru a Wal-Mart bag so easily that, no exaggeration, you couldn't tell it was going thru anything unless you were looking. To finish up I stropped on two different planks of balsa wood, one doused liberally with Hand American 0.5 micron Chromium Oxide paste and the other impregnated with 0.125 micron Cubic Boron Nitrate. Having reached the point where the shadow of the blade would scare hair off my arm, I opted to stop.

I used it all night at work and it pretty much falls thru whatever I want to cut.  So far I love it and it's drawing "oohs" and "aahs" fro all who behold it.  :thumb: I'm anxious to see if edge retention is equal to the Ichimonji TKC.

rahimlee54

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #89 on: 4 Dec 2010, 04:14 am »
Rob,

Let us know how you like the new knife, I have been looking at getting one of those for a couple months ago.  I am just trying to save up for stones instead it is difficult, when knives are so much cooler than stones.

Thanks
Jared

SET Man

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #90 on: 4 Dec 2010, 04:36 am »
Not only is Carter a great knifemaker,he's an amazing sharpener!  He won our "Sharpening Olympics" over at KF.

Hey!


    There is a "sharpening Olympics?" :o Did not know that.

    Rob, that is one good looking new knife there. :D Hmmm... dull out of the box? Strange, why is that?

    I have been checking the JCK also. There are some nice stuff there on their site. Wait we are talking about the same site right? This .... http://japanesechefsknife.com/

     I've been thinking of getting a nice slicer soon. Any you would recommend? Not expensive though  :icon_lol:

     Anyway, talking about new knives. I went to Korin on Mon and couldn't help myself and got another Misono 24cm carbon steel again. Yes, the same one I have now. Why? Well, I do like it a lot and everyone at my work like it too.... hope no one steal it  :icon_lol: I think I have the sharpest knife at my work right now. The reason I got another one is that I will likely buy it again in the future. So, I might as well buy it right now since these kind of thing will go up in price for sure. I also got Mizuyama #1000 and #6000 stones because they were on sale also. These are great take me less time and I get very smooth edge on these stones. :D

    Anyway, Korin still have sale for knives until Dec. 31th. Well, look like I just got myself an Xmas present for myself this year  :lol:

Take care,
Buddy :thumb:

Rob Babcock

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #91 on: 4 Dec 2010, 05:00 am »
Japanese knives are often sold semi-sharpened.  They expect the end user to apply they type of edge they prefer.  Of course in America we expect the knife to be fully sharpened.  In fact, most people will never see a knife any sharper than it was when they took it out of the box. :duh:  I don't really mind if it ships dull so long as it sharpens readily, and the CarboNext certainly does!  I used it all night at work and was really impressed with the knife.  Sharpening it has reinforced my opinion that it's really a TKC.

Right now I guess that's what I'd recommend.  The CarboNext is a great knife and it's one of the cheaper good knives JCK sells.  Of course, if you can live with a 240mm/270mm the Tojiros at CKtG are great deals and shipping is free.  And depending on what you call "not too expensive" the Kikuichi TKC is a superior knife as well.

tmij

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #92 on: 4 Dec 2010, 05:13 am »
Quote
I've been thinking of getting a nice slicer soon. Any you would recommend? Not expensive though  :icon_lol:

     Anyway, talking about new knives. I went to Korin on Mon and couldn't help myself and got another Misono 24cm carbon steel again.

Uh-oh, Buddy, looks like you caught the bug  :P

Nice book on the subject--


SET Man

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #93 on: 4 Dec 2010, 05:28 am »
Uh-oh, Buddy, looks like you caught the bug  :P
.....

Hey!

    Tito, long time no see :D  Anyway, no I don't think I have the bug :lol:  BTW... I'm working as a cook full time now, yes I still do photo works on the side part time of course :wink:

    So, yeah that is my excuse... I'm using them for work :lol:

    Maybe we could get together sometime and I'll do the cooking  8)

Take care,
Buddy :thumb:
     

tmij

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #94 on: 4 Dec 2010, 02:41 pm »
Great to hear about your job, Buddy, sounds like you're enjoying it so much you're even in denial about the knife affliction. :lol: Would love to have you over, my kitchen has enough toys and some good knives and I'd definitely love to learn some new dishes from you as long as you don't hold back, ped maak maak please!  :wink:

SET Man

Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #95 on: 9 Dec 2010, 04:41 am »
I have seen this fellow at several custom knife shows. His stuff is AMAZING & his sharping demos scary!  He is  Murray Carter, he is Canadian and moved to Japan to study under The Yoshimoto clan smiths.  He has since graduated and moved to Oregon, USA.  He is a 17th Generation Yoshimoto Bladesmith and Certified Master Bladesmith.  I just ordered some of his stuff during a sale he had for newsletter subscribers.  Here is a link to his site. 
http://www.cartercutlery.com/

Hey!

    Yesterday at work a chef came in to do some tasting dishes for the head chef and etc. I'm not sure who he was but while I was working I notice one of his Japanese style knife have a very nice handle. I didn't know what it was but from the look of it, it is not ordinary knife.

    I walked pass it a and it was Carter's :o I was like "wow, I've talk about this on AC!" Anyway, so I went up to him and talk to him about it. I asked to try it out. He was cool about it and handed  it to me. It was very nice, very light, sharp and look like he maintained it well. From Carter's site I think it is was wabocho. I was impressed. It looked like carbon steel laminated with stainless steel on the outside. I think he say it is white steel and he changed the handle.

    We ended checking out each other knife. It was funny, I was holding his Carter's and he was holding my now darker Misono's... "Nice patina on your carbon there" he said. I think others around the kitchen probably think we are nuts talking and feeling each other knife :lol:

Take care,
Buddy :thumb:

Rob Babcock

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #96 on: 9 Dec 2010, 07:03 am »
Murray Carter makes some sweet knives but the handles are pretty "disposable."  Cool that you got to do some knife testin'! :thumb:

tmij

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #97 on: 16 Dec 2010, 02:30 am »
Got this on my email today, 20% off Coupon from the Japanese Culinary Center in NYC. The only place in NY where you can find Tsukiji Masamoto.


Rob Babcock

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #98 on: 16 Dec 2010, 07:36 am »
I read about the new store at another forum.  Presuming they have a web site I'll have to check them out sometime- NY is a long way from SD! :lol:

lonewolfny42

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Re: For Japanese knife enthusiasts....
« Reply #99 on: 16 Dec 2010, 07:51 am »
I read about the new store at another forum.  Presuming they have a web site I'll have to check them out sometime- NY is a long way from SD! :lol:

New York Mutual Trading Inc. opened the Japanese Culinary Center in April of 2009 to further continue making great strides for the culinary professional. The Center will have among other things: imported Japanese dishware, high quality cutting tools and a large variety of restaurant supplies. The Japanese Culinary Center also has a test kitchen where cooking classes and sake tastings have been conducted on an ongoing regular basis.

http://japaneseculinarycenter.com/


Hmmmm.....sake tastings....... :hyper: :hyper: :hyper: :hyper: :thankyou: