Neo10 actual response curve

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aceinc

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Neo10 actual response curve
« on: 14 Jun 2019, 02:16 am »
The response curve on the BG Neo10 I see posted doesn't look particularly useful to me. I know many people here seem to use them and I am wondering what I am missing.

They state this is a dipole free air measurement, which accounts for the the shape, but does adding a baffle really flatten the curve? How does one go about designing an OB to make this usable?




Captainhemo

Re: Neo10 actual response curve
« Reply #1 on: 14 Jun 2019, 04:31 am »
Here's  a thread  that  covered   the develpment of the   Neo3/Neo10 OB monitor.  Reply   149 has  some  responses.  On these, we put boththe  Neo3 and  Neo 10  in  shallow  waveguides.   We still have a  cople    flat packs left of the  original  run
https://www.audiocircle.com/index.php?topic=152039.140

jay

Danny Richie

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Re: Neo10 actual response curve
« Reply #2 on: 14 Jun 2019, 01:48 pm »
This perfectly illustrates another question that I am often asked.

Someone will send me specs on some drivers (complete with some measured responses) and ask if I can design a crossover for them. And I say, sure. Send me your completed speaker. No I can't design a crossover without the cabinet. The response of the drivers depends on the cabinet design, how they are loaded, surface reflections, offset of the drivers, acoustic center differences, time delay, etc.

And the Neo 10 in particular has a response completely dependant on how it is used.

And sadly that published response is made in free air so it gives any potential customer no idea as to what the response might look like in any given application.

aceinc

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Re: Neo10 actual response curve
« Reply #3 on: 15 Jun 2019, 12:35 am »
Quote
And sadly that published response is made in free air so it gives any potential customer no idea as to what the response might look like in any given application.

Hence my question;

Quote
How does one go about designing an OB to make this usable?

I have started reading through the thread Captainhemo posted, perhaps all will be revealed. :popcorn:

Danny Richie

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Re: Neo10 actual response curve
« Reply #4 on: 15 Jun 2019, 03:28 pm »
These drivers are very sensitivity to how they are loaded and how the front to back wave is separated.

So I start with what I've learned about baffle size and shape and build a test baffle. Then start measuring. It also helps to be able to make on the fly alterations to the side wings to see the effect on the response. You can even cut side wings out of polystyrene. It is cheap and easy to carve up into different shapes.

And everything you do to the shape of the baffle or wings affects the response somewhere.

aceinc

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Re: Neo10 actual response curve
« Reply #5 on: 15 Jun 2019, 08:25 pm »
So the process is empirical and iterative rather than theoretic. It would be nice to at least be able to do a gross design using theory, and tweak it by listening/measuring.

sfdoddsy

Re: Neo10 actual response curve
« Reply #6 on: 19 Jun 2019, 11:13 am »
It’s not just the Neo10. Most drivers  will exhibit similar response when measured as a naked freefield dipole.

That’s why people stick them in boxes.

But most drivers don’t sound as good as a Neo10 open baffle, hence why people go through the hassle of making it work.

A baffle will flatten the response below 1.5k or so. As will active EQ.

The dipole peak (above 3k in that chart) is also baffle dependant and can be removed via crossover or EQ.

I’ve used the Neo10 and Neo3 in an open baffle with a very different configuration to GR’s, but with equally positive (for me) results.

It’s a great combo.