Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories

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DARTH AUDIO

Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #20 on: 15 Dec 2003, 03:39 pm »
Get the BUGGTUSSEL VINYL ZYME It will blow you away. It is that good. I have about 3000 records and vinyl is on 95% of the time :P . This is the best cleaner I have ever used and I used a bunch :o. I also use the VPI 16.5 with the Vinyl Zyme.

Analog stuff
VPI 16.5 Record cleaning machine
Vinyl Zyme record cleaning fluid
Onzow Zerodust stylus cleaner
Milty ZeroStat Anti-Static Gun
Mike Hunt record Brush
H.A.L.'s Way Excellent Turntable Mat

Psychicanimal

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Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #21 on: 30 Jan 2004, 05:58 pm »
I ordered a bottle of the concentrate from Quest for Sound but haven't used it yet.  Do you use the concentrate form?  Do you use a spray pump?  I still haven't set aside time to play with it--though it  was $35 for the bottle! :o

DARTH AUDIO

Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #22 on: 30 Jan 2004, 08:02 pm »
You pour the consentrate intoa gallon of distilled water. Then pour back into the spray bottle. I use about 8 to 10 sprays per side.

doug s.

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Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #23 on: 31 Jan 2004, 05:22 pm »
i also strongly recommend a kieth monks record sweeper (francisco - where'd ya ever hear about these?   :wink: ).  arthur salvatore, whose hi-end audio site caused quite a ruckus a while back, may still have some nos ones left.  do a websearch to find him...  if not, keep yer eyes peeled for one used, or a watts *dust-bug*, or something similar...  these tings will keep the record clean, & dust off the stylus, while the record is playing.  they are li'l arms mounted opposite the tonearm that track the record - but have a brush, instead of a needle...

i also highly recommend a record lifter, tho i use an ancient thorens iteration, which does the same ting...

doug s.

skchow

Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #24 on: 7 Feb 2004, 08:09 pm »
Here's some better and free strobe discs.

http://www.extremephono.com/free_turntable_strobe_disk.htm

Sunny.

Dan Driscoll

Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #25 on: 12 Feb 2004, 05:43 pm »
Another ditto for a carbon fiber brush, although IMO the Hunt is seriously over priced. Also another vote for a stylus force gauge, alignment tool and bubble level. Turntable Basics carries all of these and quite a bit more for very reasonable prices. FTR, I have no connection with this site, other than as a satisfied customer.

mannye

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My 2 cents
« Reply #26 on: 14 Feb 2004, 05:00 am »
I'm going to recommend the following:

Spin Clean (from the first post) price is right, I like the fact that the record is fully immersed in fluid while cleaning, and that the design allows for DIY testing of different cleaning fluids.  

I do not know about vacuum systems, but I could never justify the cost until the TT I use costs at least ten times what the vacuum system costs. Right now I think I have that ratio more or less...  MMF-5 (499) Spin Clean (49.95)

Gruve Glide...  I think it makes a difference...It's cheap enough that you can try it and if you don't hear anything, no harm done.  If you hear, like me, "something" it's great!

All that free srobe stuff already recommended is cool as well.

And the number one thing I recommend....and this is the most important....

Cheap garage sale LPs....  just offer them 10 bucks for the whole bunch...they will say yes.  Then clean em with your Spin Clean and LISTEN TO MUSIC...get off the computer....!!   :D

audiochef

vinal tweaks
« Reply #27 on: 21 Jul 2004, 02:55 am »
More than a tweak, the  Expressmio heavyweight is a must for Rega tonearms . This  transformed my P3.
Better mids, bass and highs.

doug s.

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Re: vinal tweaks
« Reply #28 on: 21 Jul 2004, 11:15 am »
Quote from: audiochef
More than a tweak, the  Expressmio heavyweight is a must for Rega tonearms . This  transformed my P3.
Better mids, bass and highs.

i found it completely unusable on all but perfect records.  it accentuated surface irregularities, & wouldn't even track on some of my warped lp's... i much preferred the sonics of the stock counterweight, even on my good records.  of course, i tried the expressimo, mebbe it's different from the expressmio?   :lol:

ymmv,

doug s.

ps - i noticed that your profile lists you as an electronics retailer - you don't happen to sell these, by any chance, do you?

audiochef

heavyweight
« Reply #29 on: 22 Jul 2004, 09:48 pm »
Interesting doug. Whats the associated gear that it was connected to?

Ps. no longer selling, went back to cooking

djbnh

Rega P25/RB600 Counterweight = JA Michell. Other topics...
« Reply #30 on: 23 Jul 2004, 03:17 am »
I happily use the JA Michell arm stub/counterweight on my Rega P25/RB600, currently with a Roksan Corus cart. I used to use an Iron Audio Acrylic platter with the stock counterweight; however, after I switched to the Michell counterweight, I preferred the sound with the stock glass platter, in my system, with my components (see the A-Gon link for system).

Still looking to upgrade the cartridge to a low-output MC, but will take my time since the Roksan sounds even better after upgrading to the Michell armstub/counterweight.  :mrgreen:  I've auditioned some carts recently, but none has fit my wallet/blown me away. Anyway, I have heard the Dynavectors work well with Rega arms, but can't afford a new XX-2, and feel I can do better than the high output 10x5. I also wonder if the Denon 103R would work well with my table and tonearm combo, but am concerned the Denon might not be the best fit with the RB600 lowish-mid compliance arm (how can you beat the 103R's price [$265 or so delivered]/performance ratio without spending tons more - someone want to send me one to try out?). Opinions appreciated. Please. FYI - I use an Odyssey Tempest for my preamp, which can run both MMs/MCs (Mr. Bunge recommends MCs no lower than 0.2 mV output).

Also use a Shure stylus gauge, the Rega Baerwald protractor downloaded for free from The Vinyl Engine (also was sent a protractor from a fellow Vinyl Circle member - thanks again!), and a Zerodust Stylus Cleaner. My P25, IMHO, is very well isolated - see my relatively low-cost solution on my A-Gon system link + the last thread comments on the system. The speed of the P25 keeps strobing accurately, so I'm not contemplating a power/motor upgrade at this time.

Furthermore, I'm considering purchase of the Disc Doctor brushes and album cleaner. I currently use a homebrew for album cleaning, and it seems to work fine. (Don't have $ for a record cleaning machine, and don't want one.) Again, opinions appreciated. Please.

A reminder - check The Vinyl Engine frequently for tons of freebies including on-line manuals (wish they'd get one for the P25 and the RB600, sigh - anyone want to scan theirs and submit it?), data, and advice.

John Casler

Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #31 on: 23 Jul 2004, 04:00 am »
About 1971 I had a device (inexpensive---like $19.99 or so) called a Reco-Vac.  

It held the record vertically, and would spin vacumn it with brushes mounted on each side of the slot the record slid into.  It made a noise like a hair dryer and the record spun around propelled by rollers against the outside edge.

I know my description gives you no clue to what it did or looked like, but I'm very surprised it hasn't succeded since it was cheap, simple and seemed effective.

I would wash the records and the cloth dry them then stick them in the Reco-Vac for a minute and it would dry and shine them.

Does anyone have one of these, or remember them?  I used it during a "hazy" time in my past (the 70's) so maybe I'm remembering it better than it was. :oops:

audiochef

Reco vac
« Reply #32 on: 23 Jul 2004, 05:47 am »
John, I barely remember seeing this ad with picture ina a magazine. I think.

doug s.

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Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #33 on: 23 Jul 2004, 11:43 am »
audiochef,

my o-l modified rb250 is connected to an early wersion of the oracle delphi, sinec updated to mk-v specs, excep for power supply, which was converted to o-l dc motor kit, powered by a mondo hp lab-grade power supply.

re: record care, i have never liked brushes.  except for the type on the end of a separate tonearm-like thing, that track the record whilst it's in play.  i now have a keith monks record sweeper, which also has a grounding wire, & carbon-fibre hairs in the brush - aids in keeping static down.  that replaced a watts dust-bug, which i used for almost 30 years.  these things, combined w/hand washing of my records w/mild soap & drying w/a soft lint-free rag, are all i've needed to keep my records in good shape.  re: the dust bug record sweepers, even romy the cat uses one - check the pic of his micro-seiki deck!   :wink:

http://www.goodsoundclub.com/MyPlayback.htm#Analog%20Front-End

doug s.

fredj

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Re: Disk Doctor brushes and cleaner
« Reply #34 on: 6 Aug 2004, 03:25 am »
"The cleaning process is mainly a brushing/rinsing one.  The vacuum just helps in drying/removing dirt.  I think I could live without a vacuum based machine...."


   This is true, BUT most of us live in places that have hard water meaning if you're doing your manual cleaning method at the kitchen sink and you're not rinsing with distilled and or using a vacuum you may be doing more harm than good as the
water itself evaporates but the calcium, magnesium and a whole laundry list of metallic salts are being left behind and vinyl is several levels of magnitude softer than these residual deposits,.
   I wouldn't blame anyone for not shelling out $ 200 to $400 out for one of the more basic RCM's, I never did, however I was able to borrow my Fathers and I'd do mass LP cleanings when I did, after my Dad was gone I ended up with a DIY RCM which is a Japanese Direct Drive el cheapo thrift store TT, it doesn't really matter if the motor is operable because what you're getting it for is a rotatable flat surface for cleaning LP's and even if the motor does run they generally lack the adequate torque anyway, you rotate by hand while cleaning and vacuuming.
For a Vac all you need is a very small cheap shop vac, they have more than enough power and usually a great deal more power than a RCM
you get a reletively long crevice tool cut a slot approx. the width of
the grooved area of an LP then glue a strip of either velvet, micro fiber
or cut sections of flat paint pads IMHO the later two are better, use silicone
sealer or caulk it's impervious to water or RC solutions, but peels off easily when it's time to change the strips when they're sufficiently fouled or worn, get or make a rc brush, Disc Doctor brushes aren't cheap, but they are considered the very best, for commercial solution Record Research Labs is generally considered the best, but there are any number of good commercial solutions and as many DIY solutions and in my experience it's best to have several as none do everything well.
and it's extremely important to do a final rinse and vacuum step
using distilled, RO or deionized water, this may all sound like kind of a hassle, but it'll all pay for itself in the first couple of recovered LP's
it's an absolute must if you buy used vinyl, but even if you don't new albums even expensive 200 gram. audiophile disc's use mold release in the pressig process and you do want to remove that crap to get the best sound, you only need to wet clean an LP once as long as you store and handle them properly and use a dry carbon fiber brush before and after each side to drain off static and remove dust and other crud from the grooves

fredj

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Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #35 on: 6 Aug 2004, 03:32 am »
#2  Isolation feet or spikes offer a cheap and significant tweak.[/quote]

I always used spikes, but have found that two peices of plywood with
bubble wrap between them makes a very fine isolation platform
another that works incredible is go to a toy store and buy super balls of hi bounce balls etc. cut them in half and use 3 per component, definately better than spikes or tip toes even the super expensive ones

   So many of those super expensive tweaks are pure snake oil BS
they're really boofooing the truly anal and unwary, it right up there with TV evangelists.

orthobiz

Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #36 on: 6 Aug 2004, 06:20 pm »
Yo, John:

Your memory serves you correctly!

I had a Rec-O-Vac also. Mine was in college ca. 197. Guess it did a decent job and luckily I don't think it harmed the records much (mine still sound good; I graduated to a Loricraft cleaner).

You can usually see pics of them on eBay.

Go to musicangle. com for a treatise on how to clean records with brushes. I'm an orthopedic surgeon and it looks a lot easier to do a total hip replacement than it does to clean a record properly!

biz

Tonto Yoder

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Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #37 on: 6 Aug 2004, 06:38 pm »
Quote from: orthobiz

Go to musicangle. com for a treatise on how to clean records with brushes. I'm an orthopedic surgeon and it looks a lot easier to do a total hip replacement than it does to clean a record properly!
biz

Well, of course it's more difficult to clean an LP---it's far more important!! :D
You EVER heard a new hip play Holly Cole??

lcrim

Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #38 on: 20 Oct 2004, 01:35 pm »
A respected member of the audio equipment trade gave me this one.  I have used it and I've convinced myself that it helps marginally and certainly doesn't cause problems.
Add a few drops of "Armor All" to your cleaning solution.  The original stuff in a red spray bottle is what I use.  It is a silicone based product and in small amounts seems to reduce surface noise on LP's.
I add about three drops of "Armor All" to three drops of dish detergent and fill the cleaning solution bottle w/ distilled water.  I have a vacuum cleaning record machine and the LP's now look shiney, instead of dull.  Surface noise is somewhat lessened.  It won't help if the grooves are demolished but for the anal compulsive, it is one more dubious aid to better sounding vinyl.

YMMV, IMHO, my 2 cents worth, etc.

Aman

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Reference: Recommended Vinyl Accessories
« Reply #39 on: 8 Aug 2005, 05:43 am »
I will get rid of some myths for you all :)

1. Stylus cleaning

You will never need a stylus cleaning tool in your life if you keep your records clean, dustcover on the turntable when not in use, and use a mat which is not prone to creating static electricity.

2. Record Cleaning Machines...

... are incredibly essential for vinyl listening. If you are going to be listening to vinyl more than any other source option, it is the numero uno tool. I have been through the ins and outs of vinyl cleanliness. I have tried disc doctor, for example, which HELPED, but didn't do the job. Vinyl Zyme + Record Doctor III = The only cleaning tools you'll ever need. Within a week of using the record cleaning machine, my stylus (which had a problem with tracking due to the dirt on it) was tracking better, my felt mat on my rega table wasn't sticking to the records after playing them, and, of course, everything sounded loads better. Most of my records play without me noticing one sign of floor noise or other such ticks and pops. And I must have close to 3500 records!

3. The other essential vinyl tool is the Shure Gauge, as others have specified. I am SHURE (pun shamefully intended) that the digital tracking methods out there are much better than the manual ones, though the Shure Tracking Gauge is the only other vinyl tool I have which very effectively improved my vinyl listening experience. Setting this gauge correctly save your vinyl's life, and also improves sound quality drastically. Highly recommended.

Yes, with all these accessories, you'll end up spending more on the other things than the turntable itself! Though, you must also remember that there are a lot of myths and rumors out there that don't necessarily make as big of a difference as people claim to make. And some are just plain useless if you use the OTHER, more ESSENTIAL accessories correctly.

Don't get me wrong -- I am not saying that a stylus cleaning utility is worthless... but if you only have a limited budget to spend on vinyl, it is definitely not something worth putting your money into. If you have a load of money to spend and are paranoid, a stylus cleaner will do some good, but HOW good is questionable. To my standards, and when using the LAST cleaning utilities, the record cleaning machine helped just as much as the specialty tools did.