Wimmin and games

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jqp

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Wimmin and games
« on: 7 Jul 2006, 04:32 pm »
I am on a business trip in Europe right now. Yeserday I saw in the Frankfurt train station (the busiest one in Europe) an oriental girl (American I think) buying a pretty serious gaming magazine (something about SIMS as in simulation games). Later I saw she was on my train.

I have also encountered plenty of chicks playing Halo 2.

How often do you encounter females in the gaming world, and is it a growing phenomemon?

Woodsea

Re: Wimmin and games
« Reply #1 on: 10 Jul 2006, 01:31 am »
I will not meet a lot of females in my age bracket playing video games, except of course solitaire and sodoku on PDA's and computers. 
In the next decade, I believe gaming will be around 65/35 with males being in the majority.  Games now are more than just blasting pigs away and yelling 'cum get sum!'.  If you know where that reference is from you know that we have been waiting nearly a decade for the next installment.

Se7en

Re: Wimmin and games
« Reply #2 on: 12 Aug 2006, 07:12 pm »
I will not meet a lot of females in my age bracket playing video games, except of course solitaire and sodoku on PDA's and computers. 
In the next decade, I believe gaming will be around 65/35 with males being in the majority.  Games now are more than just blasting pigs away and yelling 'cum get sum!'.  If you know where that reference is from you know that we have been waiting nearly a decade for the next installment.

I'd have to say Duke Nukem..? I think they've tried some sequels with very limited success.

I do know for a fact that there is certainly an increasing number of women working in the games industry (and I'm not just talking about licensing and marketing, but actual developers). In fact we just hired a female tools programmer at the start of the month. We have several others involved with animation, system design, production/management, etc. I can say that 10 years ago, this was seldom the case, and it is still certainly a male dominated field.

The real trick to getting more female gamers is developing more "cross-gender" product initially, and targeting a younger female audience in general. Unfortunately this demographic has not proven itself (financially), so it is pretty difficult to get a publisher to fork over millions to R&D game play systems that bias towards the female gamer. The few exceptions might be some of the Mattel products from several years ago (before they got sued), but that's only because they were only try to extend their existing market into the interactive space (Barbie Make Over, etc.). Other games like the "Sims" are sort of gender agnostic by design, but seem to end up with a stronger female fan base than male. I sort of think that guys avoid the Sims because they're perceived as "chick games".

We often run into similar issues (perhaps slightly more complex) when trying to develop North American product that also needs to have appeal in Asian territories. In this case you're dealing with an entirely different set of values and interests. At least Asia is a known $$ market, so we get some $$ to develop for it.

Just my .02

-Gabriel


Russell Dawkins

Re: Wimmin and games
« Reply #3 on: 17 Aug 2006, 10:08 pm »
To generalize, as is my inclination, I think men are more inclined to design and play with games while women are inclined to play with men! I don't see that changing soon.