Big Fat Dots for Subs?

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kbuzz3

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Big Fat Dots for Subs?
« on: 9 Oct 2018, 07:48 pm »
For reason too complicated to go into, i have to place my passive sub modules (NO  SPikes) on the bottom shelf of my tv stand.   This is a secondary system so I understand this is not a preferred or even good placement. With that said,  looking for a good  anti- vibe solution.  Would i be correct that in this application you would want to use something  made of the dbneutrualizing format?

I guessing,  the starting solution would be Four Big Fat Dots directly between the bottom of the sub and floor of cabinet

I also have some tenderfeet lying around, so wondering if there this would be better than the dots....thanks

Herbie

Re: Big Fat Dots for Subs?
« Reply #1 on: 9 Oct 2018, 08:02 pm »
For reason too complicated to go into, i have to place my passive sub modules (NO  SPikes) on the bottom shelf of my tv stand.   This is a secondary system so I understand this is not a preferred or even good placement. With that said,  looking for a good  anti- vibe solution.  Would i be correct that in this application you would want to use something  made of the dbneutrualizing format?

I guessing,  the starting solution would be Four Big Fat Dots directly between the bottom of the sub and floor of cabinet

I also have some tenderfeet lying around, so wondering if there this would be better than the dots....thanks

Tenderfeet are usually not going to be as ideal as dBNeutralizer Fat Dots for subwoofer applications. The dBNeutralizer material of the Fat Dots typically performs better at absorbing cabinet-generated vibrations from the sub, as well as isolating the sub from external vibrations and preventing cabinet-generated vibrations from transferring into the stand. For your application, a set of four Big Fat Dots between the bottom of the sub and shelf would be ideal.

Tenderfeet are better suited for components such as preamps, amplifiers, CD players, etc., where you want to absorb high-frequency micro-vibrations from the component chassis.


Robert Herbelin
Herbie's Audio Lab
« Last Edit: 10 Oct 2018, 07:49 pm by Herbie »

MttBsh

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Re: Big Fat Dots for Subs?
« Reply #2 on: 9 Oct 2018, 09:29 pm »
I recently bought a box of DiversiTech anti vibration pads and placed them under all of my components including floor standing speakers and subs. The result was a stunning improvement in clarity, soundstage and fullness of sound, and this is a pretty high end system. Under the subs, the bass in cleaner, tighter, fuller.

Each pad is 52 cents. A box of 48 was $25.00.

I would be very surprised if other anti-vibration devices make a better sound improvement, regardless of cost.

https://www.supplyhouse.com/DiversiTech-MP-2E-EVA-Anti-Vibration-Pad-2-x-2-x-7-8?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIpMaAwKT63QIVlIZ-Ch1SGQ6TEAYYAiABEgJlyfD_BwE

S Clark

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  • measurement? We don't need no stinkin measurement
Re: Big Fat Dots for Subs?
« Reply #3 on: 9 Oct 2018, 09:45 pm »
Hey MttBsh, perhaps you didn't notice this circle is paid for by Herbie's Audio Lab.  I"m sure you meant well, but using this space to advertise a competitive product is not a great idea. 

Herbie

Re: Big Fat Dots for Subs?
« Reply #4 on: 9 Oct 2018, 10:22 pm »
I recently bought a box of DiversiTech anti vibration pads and placed them under all of my components including floor standing speakers and subs. The result was a stunning improvement in clarity, soundstage and fullness of sound, and this is a pretty high end system. Under the subs, the bass in cleaner, tighter, fuller.

Each pad is 52 cents. A box of 48 was $25.00.

I would be very surprised if other anti-vibration devices make a better sound improvement, regardless of cost.

https://www.supplyhouse.com/DiversiTech-MP-2E-EVA-Anti-Vibration-Pad-2-x-2-x-7-8?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIpMaAwKT63QIVlIZ-Ch1SGQ6TEAYYAiABEgJlyfD_BwE

Hi, MttBsh. I'm glad to hear that the DiversiTech anti-vibration pads are working well for you. I'd imagine that, to some degree, they are helping to damp vibrations from each of your components, though I'd imagine that there's some sonic tradeoff that is masked by the overall improvement they provide. Although they damp vibrations, most rubbery audio products respond too slowly to microphonic compression and decompression for superior audio resolution. Most are made of industrial rubbers like Vitron or Nitrile, or cheap plastics like PVC, all of which have resonance issues that muddy-up the audio spectrum. Soft polyurethanes like Sorbothane and Norsorex lack the reflexive counter-punch needed to fight microphonics and have a tendency to produce ill-defined bass and some high-frequency loss or false emphasis. Footers that are simply stamped out of engineering foams tend to be weight-specific to a narrow range. Though they do very well in some situations and can provide an overall net improvement in the sound you're hearing, their use is virtually always at the cost of some sonic trade-off or in deference to personal taste. After all, the raw materials from which these products are made have been formulated primarily for purposes other than audio, e.g., footwear insoles, cushions, industrial seals, motor supports, microwave gaskets, or in the case of DiversiTech EVA pads, HVAC equipment.

Herbie's isolation materials are formulated exclusively for and only for audio/video component applications. The compliant materials neutralize acute vibrations and resonance with firm counter-pressure, responding with lightning speed to micro-vibrational impulse. They will neither dull nor enhance frequency response. By simply reducing vibration, resonance, and microphonic influence in the audio electronics realm, they help bring out more of the full sonic potential of your components.

While I'm certain that the DiversiTech pads are an improvement over using nothing for component isolation and damping, I'm sure that using Herbie's compliant footers would go a long way in improving the sound of your system even further.


Robert Herbelin
Herbie's Audio Lab

MttBsh

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Re: Big Fat Dots for Subs?
« Reply #5 on: 10 Oct 2018, 12:10 am »
Hey MttBsh, perhaps you didn't notice this circle is paid for by Herbie's Audio Lab.  I"m sure you meant well, but using this space to advertise a competitive product is not a great idea.

Sorry, I didn't realize this is a paid circle, but I was not trying to "advertise' DiversiTech. I have absolutely no affiliation with the company, I'm just a guy that enjoys audio sharing my experience and a way to possibly save a few bucks. I have used Herbie's products in the past and they have always performed very well for me.

RDavidson

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Re: Big Fat Dots for Subs?
« Reply #6 on: 10 Oct 2018, 02:24 am »
Color me impressed with the professional response by Robert (Herbie's Audio Lab). While I don't condone pointing to competitors' products in this or other paid forums, I like that he used it as an opportunity to extol the virtues of his own products rather than blast the competition or blast the poster. I think this really says a lot about both Rob and his highly successful product line. I hope others find this very encouraging also. :D

kbuzz3

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Re: Big Fat Dots for Subs?
« Reply #7 on: 10 Oct 2018, 02:28 pm »
Thank you everyone for the replies.  I will contact herbies to discusss specific sizes and shapes  of big fat dots for my TBI subwoofer modules which have the following specs:

WIDTH   14.5 inches ( 368.3 mm ))
DEPTH   14.5 inches ( 368.3 mm )
HEIGHT   5.5 inches ( 139.7 mm ) no feet ( 7 inches w/spikes )
WEIGHT   15 lbs ( 6.8 kg )

I should note for the record that i have been at the audio game since 1989 and have tried a large variety of isolation products.  After many years of expereimentation i prefer herbies products in general.  This includes the gliders under speaker stands and herbies DBneutralizing smaller square pads to great positive effect under center channel speakers mounted in or on top of cabinets.  These square dots are also superlative under smaller speakers  on top of a number of different speaker stands. (they seem to sound best when used with sklyan's for some reason)
I also use tenderfeet judiciously under many of my components and baby booties under smaller power supplies. All work great and dont give a "mushy" or smearing type of sound. 
This is the reason i posted here, having great success in the past.  Whether its now wroth cost of 8 more fat dots is a personal choice.

I will also add that i also run a number of vintage amps and preamps, which have less than NASA quality metal cabinets.  The tendfeet work well here but for some reason Isonodes seem to prefer that that application.

 I have also used the type of cork product listed above and that is a trial and error process at best.  Sometimes good sometimes neurtral and sometimes just ok.  They are best IMO used under noisy inkjet printers as a fyi.

I always find it humorous that the two main sellers of these products for audio application claim to have "tuned them by ear". Id like to see what that method was :lol: