Woodworking Question

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Don_S

Woodworking Question
« on: 1 Sep 2018, 11:48 pm »
I had a local woodworker build me a rack many years ago from maple butcher block.  Now I want to build another one using walnut butcher block.  What tool is used to make the routed edges shown in the picture?  I have a full-size router and a friend has a heavy-duty table setup but those would rout the entire edge and leave gaps at the joints.  Obviously this routing was done after assembly. Hoping for a one-time-use tool from Harbor Freight.  Oh yea, also hoping it is idiot proof.  :lol:


 

WC

Re: Woodworking Question
« Reply #1 on: 2 Sep 2018, 12:17 am »
A hand held router with a chamfering bit should work. You run the router along the face frame, since you are balancing the base of the router on the thin face frame a smaller router may work better.

WGH

Re: Woodworking Question
« Reply #2 on: 2 Sep 2018, 12:18 am »
A 45 degree chamfer bit. I didn't find one at the Harbor Freight website.

$18.00 at Ace Hardware

$19.95 at Grizzly Tool: http://www.grizzly.com/products/45-Chamfer-Bit-1-4-Shank-1-3-8-Dia-/C1130
The ball bearing keeps the wood from burning.


Don_S

Re: Woodworking Question
« Reply #3 on: 2 Sep 2018, 01:21 am »
I have one of these.  It worked great to cut through ceramic tile, 1/2" cement board, and 3/4" plywood kitchen counter. I cut the tile and cement board first then chased with a smaller diameter wood bit. Would it work for my project?

Does the wheel on the chamfer bit act as a guide in conjunction with the guide on the router?  I see the router guide keeping the router at a right angle and the wheel keeping the depth uniform.  I need to measure my tool to see if I have clearance between shelves.

https://www.harborfreight.com/electric-cutout-tool-42831.html






jcotner

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 189
Re: Woodworking Question
« Reply #4 on: 2 Sep 2018, 02:45 am »
I have one of these. Would it work for my project?

Not quite, that's like a Roto-Zip tool and they use 1/8" bits. Router bits are either 1/4" or 1/2"
shank (shaft). The wheel in the end of the bit is a bearing and it's keeps the bit from going
through the work piece.
So you will need a router to use that kind of bit.

Here is another source for bits https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_chamf.html
and they ship free. These and the Grizzly are cheaper bits, but if you don't have much to do, they will do.

I would always prefer to do these type of trim pieces in a router table, but if you do them hand held be very
careful at the ends where you stop and allow the router to quit spinning before you try to remove it from the
work piece. Also try to let the router start to spin down right when you get to the end to avoid any burning.

WGH

Re: Woodworking Question
« Reply #5 on: 2 Sep 2018, 05:02 am »
No router guide needed. The bearing is the guide. Assemble the shelves, lay the finished unit on it's back and run the router with the chamfer bit around the inside. The router base sits on the 1-1/2" wide face, a little tippy but you can do it. Keep both hands on the router handles for control or you will loose finger tips.
Dozens of youtube videos: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=routing+chamfers

jcotner

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 189
Re: Woodworking Question
« Reply #6 on: 2 Sep 2018, 05:22 am »
Oh yeah something you can do to help with the tippy issue.
If you have something like a Bessy K-body clamp and the
face frame is not too stiff, you can cut a balance board
to go inside the face frame. Just some thing like a 2x1
cut to fit snug inside the frame and use the clamp on the
outside to put enough pressure on it to keep in in place.
That will provide support to the top edge of the router
base. No wobble at all.
If you don't want to bother, just practice these on a few
scrap boards, if you haven't done this before.