Nice review of Spatial M4 Triode Masters in August's Positive Feedback Online

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Manolo

And thorough as far as positioning the loudspeakers and room interaction and his opinions are really interesting also. My experience with my M4's albeit not TM, are similar.


ric

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Loooooong review (for my limited attention span, no, I'm not looking at my phone).
Lastly he says, "The problem, I suspect, is that in the crossover region, some combination of the dipole bass side-wall cancellation and the inherent beaming of a large driver at the top of its pass band shifts the off-axis tonal balance towards the wider-dispersion treble."  Something is amiss (for him) and I will reiterate my use of DIY Shakti Hallowgraphs as a way of  shifting the soundfield, depending on the recording, to allow more hall like openness or directness, depending on taste. Also, it could be that he needs to live with these for a while (as all speakers do) and adjust what he can when he can, including ancillary equipment.
Or, he could could be right, I'm just not hearing what he's describing (different rooms, for different folks). :icon_surprised: 

Tyson

Loooooong review (for my limited attention span, no, I'm not looking at my phone).
Lastly he says, "The problem, I suspect, is that in the crossover region, some combination of the dipole bass side-wall cancellation and the inherent beaming of a large driver at the top of its pass band shifts the off-axis tonal balance towards the wider-dispersion treble."  Something is amiss (for him) and I will reiterate my use of DIY Shakti Hallowgraphs as a way of  shifting the soundfield, depending on the recording, to allow more hall like openness or directness, depending on taste. Also, it could be that he needs to live with these for a while (as all speakers do) and adjust what he can when he can, including ancillary equipment.
Or, he could could be right, I'm just not hearing what he's describing (different rooms, for different folks). :icon_surprised: 

I've experienced this same issue with similar style OB speakers I ran for a few years.  Its an inherent problem between a small tweeter and a large midrange driver.  There's a few things you can do to ameliorate it.  First would be to use a longer throat/waveguide for the tweeter which focuses it's output more (not really an option here), or use a larger tweeter and cross it lower to the midrange driver (although you might not get all the way to 20khz with a larger tweeter).  More practically - you could shelve the tweeter's output by a db or 2.  Or you can select upstream equipment that's warm sounding.  But most importantly - treat the front of the room, heavily.  A "Live End Dead End" or LEDE approach works really well.  Damp the area beside and behind the speakers heavily & leave the rest of the room fairly live and it's a nice result. 

Part of the reason I love the X2 so much is it solves this particular issue very elegantly.  And it uses the world's best tweeter, to boot :thumb:

Hear Clifford Brown

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the AMT in the X2 is crossed over at 800Hz.  Midrange is generally defined as the frequency range between 300Hz and 5,000Hz.  That means the AMT in the X2 is covering 89% of the midrange.  So it might be a misnomer to say the X2 uses the world's best tweeter.   Could possibly be the best midrange/tweeter.  :thumb:

Tyson

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the AMT in the X2 is crossed over at 800Hz.  Midrange is generally defined as the frequency range between 300Hz and 5,000Hz.  That means the AMT in the X2 is covering 89% of the midrange.  So it might be a misnomer to say the X2 uses the world's best tweeter.   Could possibly be the best midrange/tweeter.  :thumb:

Oh yeah, that thing is astonishingly great.

rollo

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I've experienced this same issue with similar style OB speakers I ran for a few years.  Its an inherent problem between a small tweeter and a large midrange driver.  There's a few things you can do to ameliorate it.  First would be to use a longer throat/waveguide for the tweeter which focuses it's output more (not really an option here), or use a larger tweeter and cross it lower to the midrange driver (although you might not get all the way to 20khz with a larger tweeter).  More practically - you could shelve the tweeter's output by a db or 2.  Or you can select upstream equipment that's warm sounding.  But most importantly - treat the front of the room, heavily.  A "Live End Dead End" or LEDE approach works really well.  Damp the area beside and behind the speakers heavily & leave the rest of the room fairly live and it's a nice result. 

Part of the reason I love the X2 so much is it solves this particular issue very elegantly.  And it uses the world's best tweeter, to boot :thumb:

  Could not agree more about AMT drivers. The top end of AMT drivers has no competition IMHO. Yet to hear the Spatial line. Would love to hear them some day.

charles