Songtowers

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Denverhifi

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 68
Songtowers
« on: 17 Dec 2013, 02:28 am »
In October I got a new pair of Salk Songtowers. As good as they sound, I knew that I was listening to my room also. My house is on a cement slab, and my listening room has a bamboo floor. I've been building a new system this year so I didn't know how much I needed the spikes. The Songtowers have pointed spikes. I had to get something from Home Depot, since the spikes are a bad match with the soft bamboo floor-marks on the floor.
Today, I got the stainless steel spikes. Wow! Immediate obvious improvement. More texture in the bass, and generally more clarity. The gliders are letting me hear more of the music, and less of my room. A couple of my Cd's that I had dismissed since I got the Songtowers now sound much better.
After reading this forum, I knew it would be money well spent. I'm just happy that it is more than I expected.
It won't be my last purchase!

Patrick

Herbie

Re: Songtowers
« Reply #1 on: 17 Dec 2013, 03:58 am »
Today, I got the stainless steel spikes.

Hi, Patrick. I am assuming that you're referring to Herbie's stainless steel Cone/Spike Decoupling Gliders, and using them under the stock Songtower spikes.

Steve Herbelin
Herbie's Audio Lab

Denverhifi

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 68
Re: Songtowers
« Reply #2 on: 17 Dec 2013, 04:09 am »
Yes, your assumption is correct.

Patrick

WGH

Re: Songtowers
« Reply #3 on: 17 Dec 2013, 03:09 pm »
Herbie's Glides also work very well under HT2-TL's, they look great and keep my maple floor hole free.



Wayne

n2siast

Re: Songtowers
« Reply #4 on: 1 Jan 2014, 05:07 pm »
Will the gliders benefit speakers on carpet?

Herbie

Re: Songtowers
« Reply #5 on: 1 Jan 2014, 06:05 pm »
Decoupling/isolation Gliders most certainly benefit speakers on carpet.

Steve
Herbie's Audio Lab

putz

Re: Songtowers
« Reply #6 on: 2 Jan 2014, 12:07 am »
Herbie's Glides also work very well under HT2-TL's, they look great and keep my maple floor hole free.



Wayne

I have HT3s with the same spikes as pictured above and carpeted floors. A few questions:

How tippy are the Gliders compared to not using gliders. One speaker is in a high traffic area and worried about someone bumping into it and knocking over.

Are the Giant Gliders more stable than the regular ones.

Is it easier to move/slide the speakers on the gliders if I want to move them. My carpet is not thick.  Berber I think.

Any reason to use Titanium or SS over the Brass disks from a sonic standpoint.

WGH

Re: Songtowers
« Reply #7 on: 2 Jan 2014, 12:52 am »
Stability with the small gliders seems about the same as without. I never tried them on carpet but I would think a larger glider would slide better on carpet if bumped. The dimples aren't that deep, if the spike jumped out of the glider then you would be in trouble.

In your high traffic situation then Herbie's threaded stud could be an option.



Wayne

Herbie

Re: Songtowers
« Reply #8 on: 2 Jan 2014, 01:42 am »
Hi, putz. You shouldn't have any problem on berber carpet. On very thick carpet with spongy underpad, Giant Gliders allow easier mobility of the speakers but either way you'll have very good lateral stability. Salk HT3 speakers have a considerably wide footprint relative to their height and plenty of heft, so I can't really imagine them being tipped over by accident or any spikes slipping out. When you move the speakers, push from a low position and take it easy as you go--not like pushing a shopping cart around or anything.

As WGH suggests, Threaded Stud Gliders are an excellent option to accomplish the same isolation/decoupling of the speakers, especially if the floor gives much resistance to the speakers sliding. With a superior isolation/decoupling approach, there's scarcely ever any real need for spikes at all. With dBNeutralizer isolation provided by either of these Gliders, you should get a more linear and better-defined bass with deep extension and subtle all-around improvements throughout the audio spectrum.

Any difference in sonic results between brass and titanium Gliders is most likely to be subtle. Might not be apparent right away in an A/B comparison manner, but prolonged audition will usually give an appreciable thumbs up to the titanium Gliders, maybe just a little less listening fatigue, perhaps nothing you can really put your finger on other than just a more relaxed and engaging musical experience. Of course, comparative differences will vary from one system to another; differences might be virtually inaudible or could be quite profound. Depends somewhat on how the metals interact with the spikes they're being used with and the overall micro-vibrational environment. Titanium tends to do the best with taming higher-frequency acute vibrations that contribute to audible glare.

Steve Herbelin
Herbie's Audio Lab