Isolation recommendation—rack/amp/speaks

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jupiterboy

Isolation recommendation—rack/amp/speaks
« on: 18 Sep 2013, 07:07 pm »
Love the products. I use big fat dots under my stock Sota feet (wonderful) and just added a round of tube dampers.

I have a tube integrated with little rubbery bits in the base of the stock feet. I don’t want to build it up, as I need clearance above to keep the tubes running cool.

The amp is on a Salamander rack that is on heavy spikes/brass footers on a wood floor.

Speakers on spikes on same wood floor.

I could put something under each of the six spikes of the rack, or under the amp, and then speaks are really a separate issue.

Trying to prioritize with the goal of getting the best resolution/tracking/performance from my turntable.

Herbie

Re: Isolation recommendation—rack/amp/speaks
« Reply #1 on: 18 Sep 2013, 08:02 pm »
Hi, jupiterboy. You don't want to put compliant decoupling material under rubber feet, anyway. Doing so unconstrains the rubber, giving it more freedom to resonate and reverberate to sonic detriment. To bring out more of the inherent potential of the amp, I suggest four Tenderfoot isolation feet in direct contact with both the chassis bottom and rack shelf (Big Tall version if you need the extra height to lift the component free of the stock feet, or just remove the stock feet). A Cone/Spike Decoupling Glider under each of the loudspeaker spikes will provide superb isolation/decoupling for the speakers, which is essential for their best performance and should also be given a high priority.

Steve
Herbie's Audio Lab

jupiterboy

Re: Isolation recommendation—rack/amp/speaks
« Reply #2 on: 18 Sep 2013, 08:06 pm »
Thanks, how about the rack? (Check gallery image.)

Would the amp and everything else benefit more from isolating the rack? Or should I treat the amp separately?

Herbie

Re: Isolation recommendation—rack/amp/speaks
« Reply #3 on: 18 Sep 2013, 09:05 pm »
The amp and other components will usually benefit substantially from isolating the rack as a whole. Still, it's always most essential to isolate/decouple each component individually. Electronic components self-generate micro-vibrations, transformer hum, motor vibrations, etc. With components each well isolated, isolating the rack provides additional, supplementary benefit. As far as priorities, I suggest addressing the rack after isolating the components and speakers.

Steve
Herbie's Audio Lab