Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?

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jsaliga

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Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #20 on: 10 May 2010, 03:18 pm »
I think real world figures are 5-10x.

Where are you getting your information from?

--Jerome

planet10

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Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #21 on: 10 May 2010, 09:14 pm »
Not me personally anymore. But i have been doing Mac support for 26 years and have hung out and worked with more than a few as well as done a LOT of beta testing.

dave

Lyndon

Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #22 on: 10 May 2010, 10:29 pm »
Thought I would add the email I got from the Pure Vinyl guy concerning the Macs.
> If I did look for a Macbook, what would be the minimum requirements to use your Pure Vinyl software program effectively?

The latest model MacBook lacks a Firewire port. This would limit your choices of audio hardware. Any current Mac Mini, MacBook Pro, iMac or Mac Pro machine would be fine (all have Firewire ports). If you want to use the iTunes Music Server feature with Memory Play, having at least 4 GB of RAM is best.

Thank you,

Channel D Support

JDUBS

Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #23 on: 19 May 2010, 03:19 am »
Hey guys.  I shot Channel D an email to see if they could post to this thread and address folks' questions.  I'm particularly interested in hardware requirements and recommended mic preamps.

Hopefully we'll hear from them directly.

-Jim

JDUBS

Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #24 on: 20 May 2010, 01:45 am »
Guys, got a response back from Channel D.  Understandably, they are very busy and participating here would be tough, but they (Rob Robinson, specifically) did send me a REALLY nice and helpful response.  Here it is:

"Hello,

Thanks for the heads-up on the thread, and the invitation to post. As you probably know, it can be very time consuming to contribute to Internet forums and then monitor and respond to follow up posts. However, you can post this response, if you like.

Questions directed to the Channel D support email address found on Channel D website are answered as quickly as possible, and telephone support also is available. Just to clarify some of the issues raised in the thread, however (of course, most if not all of this information can be found in the complete documentation included with Pure Vinyl (the 2.3 application suite) and the Pure Vinyl 3 Preview Release, as well as on our website):

Any dual core Intel Mac Mini has more than enough grunt to handle 192 kHz with Pure Vinyl. That sample rate is recommended, because the RIAA correction is improved compared to lower sample rates (the signal is more "analog-like").

RAM is not an issue, the stock 1 - 2 GB is sufficient, unless, as pointed out, wanting to use the Memory Play feature of the iTunes Music Server, where at least 4 GB of RAM is beneficial. It is do-able even on older machines; an older PowerPC G4 or G5 also can be used, but at 192 kHz, system setup and optimization become more important. As for an Apple TV, that is not a good choice, too limiting (for a music server, that is; can't be used with Pure Vinyl at all). A Mac Mini can do all that an Apple TV can, and more. Besides high resolution digital audio (and phono, with Pure Vinyl): home theater setup with widescreen 1080p HDTV, Netflix streaming video, terrestrial or cable HDTV reception (with a $100 dongle), DVD player? Capably handles all of that (except for Blu-ray, but that's another story; need a separate player)... and the wireless mouse and keyboard are a very capable remote.

For storage, a USB2 pocket drive or NAS are sufficient, speed is not an issue here.

Additional gain will be required besides a MC step-up transformer, can't simply go into line inputs. I believe the enjoythemusic review used additional analog gain available on the computer's audio input, and even then might not have been close to digital full scale input. I think it says a lot that the quality was as good as reported, without even being close to having the optimum setup.

As far as recommending equipment... that is strictly determined by personal budget. If you can afford more expensive preamps or audio interfaces, they will deliver noticeably better performance. It would be nice if the optimum sound quality could be engineered at a low price point, but it is not practical to address all the issues while keeping the price low. The Fireface 400 is a nice, solid, high-value, all-in-one solution for using a low output MC cartridge and supporting 192 kHz, and is one of the few interfaces that also has a balanced high impedance input suitable for MM cartridges. A Lynx Aurora (with Firewire card) or L22/LynxTWO (in a Mac G4 or G5 tower, or Intel tower with an expensive Magma PCI adaptor) combined with our Seta Model L or H phono preamp is noticeably better sounding, but also considerably more expensive. But keep in mind that most of the improvement in sound quality (compared to a standard phono preamp) is due to the RIAA correction in software (presuming a capable gain stage / preamp, which includes the Fireface above and several others), and the additional improvement from having more expensive audio interface hardware, while surely noticeable, is somewhat less by comparison. Diminishing returns applies.

Here is a list of "sound cards" (to use that term loosely):
http://www.channld.com/soundcards1.html

Besides the above list, the software is designed to work with any Mac compatible interface. Bear in mind that there are many more options out there, and it is probably impractical to test them all.

Note that it's also possible to have more than a two-way crossover with Pure Vinyl / Pure Music, by using the AudioUnit plug-ins in conjunction with the built-in crossover. The built-in crossover uses 64 bit internal precision, however, compared to 32 bit for the plug-ins. The capability of the built-in crossover will be expanded in the near future, as will the flexibility of handling multiple inputs, used with a multichannel input ADC, as a virtual line stage preamp with multiple selectable input sources. All of this stuff will then be accomplished tidily in one application.

Support is an important issue when considering introducing a product on the Windows platform. The number of possible system configurations is greatly multiplied. For less technically savvy users, a company would then have to serve as front line support for Windows, in addition to its own products. So rather than divert resources to that platform for the sake of a larger market, better to focus all effort on the Mac platform and deliver really great products taking advantage of all that platform has to offer. Other companies also choose to focus only on the Mac; and some have even dropped Windows, for instance, Apogee.

I hope this is helpful and not too long of an answer.

Rob Robinson
Channel D Support"

The crossover stuff, in particular, has me very intrigued.  Really cool stuff!

-Jim

bunnyma357

Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #25 on: 20 May 2010, 04:00 am »
I can also vouch for how speedy Rob Robinson has been in responding to questions, I had a couple of feature requests, and within hours he gave me workarounds, listed the limitations of the workarounds, and indicated that the features were already in the works in a future release, which is a good indicator that the direction of the software development is in sync with what I'm looking for.

Rob was also very helpful when I talked to him briefly at RMAF in suggesting a MC cartridge, and gave me as much time and consideration as anyone else, despite my lower end system, and at that point I was still just demoing the software.

The crossover has me very intrigued as well, and I just started this thread to get more info on creating a low cost/high value software-based active crossover.

http://www.audiocircle.com/index.php?topic=81402.0

So far, Pure Vinyl has far surpassed what I had planned on using it for, and I thought it was a great value just using it as a MC Phono Pre and Vinyl Archiving software. iTunes enhancement, Crossovers, Plug-In support, are just bonuses that have made real world improvements to my system. And it seems like they are intent on continually pushing the software forward.


Jim C

JDUBS

Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #26 on: 23 Dec 2010, 08:25 am »
Guys, anyone have (any more) experience with Pure Vinyl?  I'm really intrigued by the potential for 24/192 digital playback and using the same system to play vinyl.  Specifically, a Mac Mini with a RME Fireface 400 used in conjunction with the software to create an actively triamplified system suitable for digital and analog media.

Jim

doctorcilantro

Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #27 on: 28 Mar 2013, 05:56 am »
Just curious, why bother to go to all the trouble to get a vinyl setup correct if you are just going to digitize it?

To archive it. Something like 70% of vinyl recordings have never been issued digtilly (albeit some for good reason).

planet10

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Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #28 on: 28 Mar 2013, 05:27 pm »
Like the doctor says... to make good music available no where else easily available.

dave

neobop

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Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #29 on: 28 Mar 2013, 06:11 pm »
From Channel D:
"As far as recommending equipment... that is strictly determined by personal budget. If you can afford more expensive preamps or audio interfaces, they will deliver noticeably better performance. It would be nice if the optimum sound quality could be engineered at a low price point, but it is not practical to address all the issues while keeping the price low. The Fireface 400 is a nice, solid, high-value, all-in-one solution for using a low output MC cartridge and supporting 192 kHz, and is one of the few interfaces that also has a balanced high impedance input suitable for MM cartridges."

Tonepub made a good point, possibly for the wrong reason I suspect.  The implication here, is that a higher quality archive could be achieved with better equipment.  I think there could be the possibility of exceeding most, if not all conventional phono preamp technology, purely in the digital realm, but I don't know that.  It's interesting to contemplate.  Perfect sound forever a step closer to reality?
neo


jtwrace

Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #30 on: 28 Mar 2013, 06:14 pm »
Does anyone have any recommendations for a 2ch MicPre for this purpose?  The Channel D Seta is quite expensive.

WC

Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #31 on: 28 Mar 2013, 06:34 pm »
Does anyone have any recommendations for a 2ch MicPre for this purpose?  The Channel D Seta is quite expensive.

Some are using the Sound Designs USBPre2 which is around $850.

jtwrace

Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #32 on: 28 Mar 2013, 06:38 pm »
Some are using the Sound Designs USBPre2 which is around $850.
I'll take a look.  I do have an A/D as I have a Lynx Hilo.

jxo

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Re: Pure Vinyl - computer software as a phono preamp?
« Reply #33 on: 24 Nov 2018, 10:06 pm »
Old thread. 

Any recent experience with preamps to use with Pure Vinyl that don't do the RIAA EQ so one can use the software RIAA?