Bicycling Off-Road

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WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1100 on: 17 May 2013, 03:02 am »
 Where can I look at, test ride, purchase a Merlin XLM bike close to Cincinnati Ohio.

Thanks,
Steve

Ref photo


Levi

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1101 on: 17 May 2013, 04:44 am »
Not sure if they still make an XLM because Merlin was bought by Competitive Cyclist.  Try Craigslits?

WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1102 on: 17 May 2013, 04:59 am »
Dam. Bike sold on Craigslist.  :(
 
« Last Edit: 17 May 2013, 04:59 pm by WireNut »

WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1103 on: 18 May 2013, 03:50 am »
Hi all, I really need your help.

 One of the two bikes below just might be my first bike purchase in 30 years. I like the mountain bike feel. The first bike I’m thinking about is the Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc 29er, and the second bike is a Gary Fisher Marlin sport disc 29er made by Trek. Both bikes are the same price at $700.00. Not sure which bike is the better of the two. I have dealers for both bikes in my area.

Thanks for any advice,
Steve

Specialized  Hardrock Sport  Disc  29er
http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/hardrock/hardrocksportdisc29


Gary Fisher Marlin Sport Disc 29er by Trek
 http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/collections/gary_fisher/mountain/sport/29er_sport/marlin/#/us/en/model/features?url=us/en/collections/gary_fisher/mountain/sport/29er_sport/marlin

« Last Edit: 18 May 2013, 11:47 pm by WireNut »

WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1104 on: 18 May 2013, 10:22 pm »
 Any thought's  :?:
« Last Edit: 18 May 2013, 11:47 pm by WireNut »

jackman

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1105 on: 19 May 2013, 12:32 am »
Have you looked at a Lynskey?  They are made in Tennesee and are the best new Ti bikes, IMO.  They also have great prices and some great sales once in a while. Give them a call and see if they have anything B stock or on sale.  They are very highly regarded and I've seen their stuff, very cool.

http://www.lynskeyperformance.com/store/silver-series-main/mt29-main.html

WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1106 on: 19 May 2013, 01:08 am »
Have you looked at a Lynskey?  They are made in Tennessee and are the best new Ti bikes, IMO.  They also have great prices and some great sales once in a while. Give them a call and see if they have anything B stock or on sale.  They are very highly regarded and I've seen their stuff, very cool.

http://www.lynskeyperformance.com/store/silver-series-main/mt29-main.html

Hi Jackman,

Thanks so much. I like the looks of the MT 29. It's a bit more then I wanted to spend for my first bike but as a audiophile and machinist, I really appreciate good quality parts. I think I just might take a cruise down to Tennessee and have a look see.  :thumb:

Looks like the frames are made out of Titanium  :o  I've machined Titanium many times. Light weight and very strong :thumb:

jackman

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1107 on: 19 May 2013, 01:15 am »
There are a couple Lynskey bikes in my group and I have seen some of their handmade MTB bikes.  The welds are perfect and the tubes are uniquely shaped. Also, I wasn't kidding about sales. They will sell their prototypes or b stock.  You will not find a better constructed frame, from a very special American company.

WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1108 on: 19 May 2013, 01:25 am »
Hmm, looks like the frame only starts at $1100. Price goes up from there.
« Last Edit: 19 May 2013, 10:38 am by WireNut »

vortrex

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1109 on: 19 May 2013, 01:40 am »
I think you mentioned using it to ride paved paths and dirt roads?  I think a Ti Lynskey is kind of overkill.  Those two $700 bikes are basically the same, pick the one that fits better.


WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1110 on: 19 May 2013, 01:54 am »
I think you mentioned using it to ride paved paths and dirt roads?  I think a Ti Lynskey is kind of overkill.  Those two $700 bikes are basically the same, pick the one that fits better.

 You have a good point. I plan on test riding the Hardrock Sport Disc 29er and the Gary Fisher Marlin 29er tomorrow. 
« Last Edit: 19 May 2013, 10:30 am by WireNut »

Outofthewoods

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WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1112 on: 20 May 2013, 06:37 am »
Hey Wirenut,
Check out the Airborne Guardian. :thumb:
You get a lot more bike for your money compared to the Gary Fisher and Specialized.
My wife rides a 16" Goblin. (The 16" frame has the "kinked" top tube.)
Ruben

       Thanks Ruben,
  :o  Those are all nice looking bikes and they do have better parts then some I've looked at in that price range.
       Wish they had a dealer locally so I could go test ride one. Since it's online only, if something breaks where
       do you get your parts from  :?:


Outofthewoods

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1113 on: 20 May 2013, 01:07 pm »
       Thanks Ruben,
  :o  Those are all nice looking bikes and they do have better parts then some I've looked at in that price range.
       Wish they had a dealer locally so I could go test ride one. Since it's online only, if something breaks where
       do you get your parts from  :?:

Their customer support (Eric McKenna) is excellent! Give them a call and you'll get all the help you need in selecting the right size frame. If need be, you can dial your reach in by moving the spacers on your steer tube around, flipping the stem over, getting a shorter stem, and swapping out the bars. The Guardian uses the same frame as the first generation Goblin, of which there are a lot of rave reviews on the web.

If you have a part issue that's covered under warranty they'll take good care of you.  :thumb:

Best!

Ruben

jackman

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1114 on: 20 May 2013, 01:59 pm »
If you are only looking at riding some light trails and paved paths, I'm not sure you want to spend a lot of money.  There are lots of options from Trek, Specialized, and other companies.  I like supporting local bike shops but if you plan to keep the bike a long time and ride more technical stuff, the Lynskey bike is a great chioce.  Their Ti frames are built to last a lifetime and they ride like a dream. 

Some people may disagree, but I prefer metal bikes to CF for off road riding.  Aluminum is great for FS bikes but hard-tail aluminum bikes (like the Cannondale I own) can beat you up on rough trails.  Aluminum is light but it's very stiff.  FS bikes have shocks to take the edge off, but aluminum hardtails can be brutal, especially the old school aluminum bikes.  I also would caution against buying a used aluminum frame because if they crack (and the old ones were known to crack) they usually cannot be fixed.  Ti and steel can be fixed, and CF can be fixed as well (Calfee and a few places do it pretty inexpensively). 

If you are only using it for light riding and have no intention of stepping up to more challenging stuff, you may just want to get a decent cyclecross bike and put fenders on it for commuting.  I'd avoid FS because it adds weight and other negatives you don't need.  If you are planning to ride challenging stuff down the road, FS bikes can be a blast to ride if you pick the right model.  However, if you are just looking for a leisurely ride in the park every now and then, any decent bike that fits you properly will do.  Even something from Performance, etc. 

WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1115 on: 20 May 2013, 06:45 pm »

 Do I need disc bikes if I'm going to be on mostly paved trails for the first 1-2 years or would rim brakes be fine?
Really all I'm after is the exercise at this point. There are a lot of paved trails in my area, plus I can ride on
the golf course path where I live at night when the golfers aren't playing. 18 holes right behind my house.
Maybe a hybrid would better suit my needs, but I do like the wide bars and wide tire feel of a MTN bike.



 


jackman

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1116 on: 20 May 2013, 07:54 pm »
Do I need disc bikes if I'm going to be on mostly paved trails for the first 1-2 years or would rim brakes be fine?
Really all I'm after is the exercise at this point. There are a lot of paved trails in my area, plus I can ride on
the golf course path where I live at night when the golfers aren't playing. 18 holes right behind my house.
Maybe a hybrid would better suit my needs, but I do like the wide bars and wide tire feel of a MTN bike.



 

A MTB bike would be fine and, no, you do not need disc brakes.  Disc brakes are great if you plan to ride through slop or need stopping power on a steep descent.  Otherwise, standard rim breaks are great.  I have rim brakes on my MTB and it works perfectly for the type of riding I do.  If I rode in slop or on technical downhill runs, I'd consider a change to discs.  I'm not a fan of hybrid bikes (unless you are an older guy) because many hybrids don't do anything particularly well.  A good 29" MTB is a great all-around bike.  You can put slick tires on and ride it in fun, leasurely century rides, put knobbies on it and ride in the dirt or ride it on a MUP/paved trail for fun and light fitness.  If you go with a budget setup, you will pay a weight penalty, but it shouldn't matter for the type of riding you plan to do.

Not for anything, but there is a guy who rides with my road group once in a while.  He's probably in his late 50's or early 60's and he rides a Surley Pugsley with huge fat tires.  This guy rides all year round, I even see him hitting the trails in the snow, and he recently completed a hilly 100 mile century ride with the group.  He didn't finish as fast as they did (his bike probably weight 40 lbs!) but he finished and completed every hill.   I'm not sure how fast he got that thing going on downhills but some of the road riders exceeded 57 mph on downhills, so I'm guessing he must have been pushing 50.   This guys is a crusty old dude and he has become somewhat of a local legend.  He's an obsessive rider who puts approximately 9,000-10,000 miles per year on his Pugsley.  Two other guys bought Pugley bikes after seeing this guy in action, but I've never seen either guy on them!  I'm not saying you should get one but wanted to point out that weight is no big deal, unless you are racing or riding with a fast group. 


WireNut

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1117 on: 20 May 2013, 11:14 pm »
A MTB bike would be fine and, no, you do not need disc brakes.  Disc brakes are great if you plan to ride through slop or need stopping power on a steep descent.  Otherwise, standard rim breaks are great.  I have rim brakes on my MTB and it works perfectly for the type of riding I do.  If I rode in slop or on technical downhill runs, I'd consider a change to discs.  I'm not a fan of hybrid bikes (unless you are an older guy) because many hybrids don't do anything particularly well.  A good 29" MTB is a great all-around bike.  You can put slick tires on and ride it in fun, leasurely century rides, put knobbies on it and ride in the dirt or ride it on a MUP/paved trail for fun and light fitness.  If you go with a budget setup, you will pay a weight penalty, but it shouldn't matter for the type of riding you plan to do.

 I’m learning that it really does come down to what fits you the best and feels right. I test road several bikes today including
a Trek Marlin, Specialize Rockhopper, Hardrock, and Crosstrail Hybrid, Diamondback Overdrive, and a Giant Revel. I personally didn’t like the Hybrid at all. The Trek Marlin and the Specialize Rockhopper both felt good to me but for the extra $200 cost of the Rockhopper I’d probably go with the Trek Marlin. I could do a Pusley but they’re too much dough for me at this time.

« Last Edit: 21 May 2013, 05:15 am by WireNut »

jackman

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1118 on: 21 May 2013, 02:53 pm »
Cool, I'm not recommending a Pugsley.  They are a very specialty bike and I only know one guy who owns and is obsessed with his.  Two other guys in the group bought them but I have never seen them on the road.  The one guy is an older dude and he rode the knobs off the tires.  he's an obsessive rider and a rare bird.  Good guy but much toughter than most people and the Pugs is his only bike.  He rides it rain or shine and on the snow and ice of Chicago. 

Get the bike that fits you best.  If you plan to keep it a long time, spend a couple extra bucks to get the one that feels best.  If you are planning five or ten mile rides, you don't need to be too picky.  If you plan to do some longer rides, 40-50 miles, it's a different ballgame.  Make sure to set aside some money for a comfy saddle and decent grips and shoes.  The touch points are very important when it comes to comfort.  Stock saddles are usually throw-aways.

nickd

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1119 on: 21 May 2013, 03:15 pm »
I'm a "Gary Fisher" rider myself. I like the long top tube and mellow head angle. Lots of comfort in the saddle for my build. The "Rockhopper" is a fine general use MTB (I.M.O.P).

Ask the store for a deal to help stretch your budget. It's a bit like buying a car, they have a some room to bargain. You'll be back for tires, accessories and service in the future. :)