Resonance Control

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Danny Richie

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Resonance Control
« on: 13 Aug 2019, 02:59 pm »
This weeks Tech Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJb8o6zzGi8

I talked a little bit about No Rez in this one. I had to include it in a resonance control talk.

If any of you would like to share your experiences with using No Rez then here or at the Youtube video is a good place to share.

Danny Richie

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Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #1 on: 13 Aug 2019, 03:03 pm »
I was just watching the video myself. Man, my Texan sure showed through when I said the word "butter".  :lol:

And I called the NX-Treme the NX-Otica. Sometimes I get me own kids names mixed up these days.

AKLegal

Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #2 on: 13 Aug 2019, 03:09 pm »
This is right on time lol.  I plan on cutting up some no rez today. 

Captainhemo

Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #3 on: 13 Aug 2019, 04:12 pm »
Again  ,    :thumb: :thumb:

Another  point  I think  worth  mentioning  is bracing.  Bracingis important.. taking a large panel and  breaking it up via  bracing will reduce resonance signifigantly as well.  Just  be sure  when  adding bracing to  fillet/chamfer  all the sharp edges off.   I've seen  some of the  pre-finished cabinets  out there  and they are typically  built using thinner/less dense  material and not  overly  well  braced.  Adding   bracing along with  the  no-rez will be a huge upgrade.

With regards to the DIY route (say heavy floor tile/ 1" OC foam),  I've done it.... a couple times way back when and IMHO, it was a PITA....too much  cutting, too much contact cement, too much  time.  When I built the cabinests for the  OB7's,  i switched to no-rez and have never  looked back. It's worth every penny.... so much easier to work with  and   will save  you  a ton of time.  When you  stick it in place,  be sure to  wipe the   area it is being placed with a tack rag.  Once it's in place,  try to rub  down  with some pressure..... the adhesive is pressure sensitive  so rubbing it down help it get a  good bite/grip..  If it's going over  a  smooth painted surface,  it sticks  basically  immediately  where it's placed so   take your time... it can be   very  hard to re-position.

We use it in all our builds now

jay

revg1952

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Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #4 on: 13 Aug 2019, 09:12 pm »
Danny
I think your basic explanations are invaluable.
Keep it up.
Gary

aceinc

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Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #5 on: 14 Aug 2019, 03:18 am »
For DIY...

What is your thought on double wall cabinets with flexible glue between the layers?

Use 3/4" material (either MDF or good plywood)  for the exterior. Then for the large panels use 1/4"-1/2" of a different material on the interior with carpet glue or green glue to adhere the pieces together.

The thought is to add additional mass as well as a material that resonates at different frequency. The flexibility of the glue reducing the transfer of energy between the panels. The rigidity of the inner panel would reduce the mass loading of any drivers.

Of course poly-fill to taste.

This is something I have mentally toyed with for any future box like cabinets.

Danny Richie

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Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #6 on: 14 Aug 2019, 03:57 pm »
For DIY...

What is your thought on double wall cabinets with flexible glue between the layers?

Use 3/4" material (either MDF or good plywood)  for the exterior. Then for the large panels use 1/4"-1/2" of a different material on the interior with carpet glue or green glue to adhere the pieces together.

The thought is to add additional mass as well as a material that resonates at different frequency. The flexibility of the glue reducing the transfer of energy between the panels. The rigidity of the inner panel would reduce the mass loading of any drivers.

Of course poly-fill to taste.

This is something I have mentally toyed with for any future box like cabinets.

Glue might get squished down to nothing when bonding the two panels together.

My favorite and easy DIY solid cabinet design can be seen here: https://www.audiocircle.com/index.php?topic=53675

cody69

Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #7 on: 14 Aug 2019, 09:52 pm »
Quote
With regards to the DIY route (say heavy floor tile/ 1" OC foam),  I've done it.... a couple times way back when and IMHO, it was a PITA....too much  cutting, too much contact cement, too much  time.

+1
I went this same route with fitting in floor tile to the inside of the cabinet. It was a royal PITA.
Don't get me wrong, the speakers sound great. But I decided it was not worth the effort.

I'm using No Rez in all new builds.

Danny Richie

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Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #8 on: 14 Aug 2019, 09:58 pm »
+1
I went this same route with fitting in floor tile to the inside of the cabinet. It was a royal PITA.
Don't get me wrong, the speakers sound great. But I decided it was not worth the effort.

I'm using No Rez in all new builds.

Thanks Cody.

WC

Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #9 on: 15 Aug 2019, 09:58 pm »
Danny,

I know you recommend no rez for resonance control, but looking at various speaker designs I have seen many things installed in other speakers such as denim or dacron on the walls and polyfill stuffing. Are they also used for resonance control in boxes or are they added for a different purpose?

Danny Richie

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Re: Resonance Control
« Reply #10 on: 15 Aug 2019, 10:15 pm »
Danny,

I know you recommend no rez for resonance control, but looking at various speaker designs I have seen many things installed in other speakers such as denim or dacron on the walls and polyfill stuffing. Are they also used for resonance control in boxes or are they added for a different purpose?

That type of material is just used for absorbing internal acoustic energy or slowing down the air flow in the box.