Cookware Recommendation

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deadhead

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 68
Re: Cookware Recommendation
« Reply #40 on: 30 Mar 2019, 06:21 pm »
If non stick is what you want buy open stock Wearever commercial grade and replace them when food starts to stick.  None of them lasts.  I keep a dedicated egg pan and don't allow it to be used with anything else.  I also have a large (14") non stick I use and replace every 6 months or so.  That's it.

Find a kitchen supply place nearby and look at Winco or Vollrath products.  They have triple ply bottoms and distribute heat very well.  Some of mine are 25 years old and look brand new. 

I'll second and third cast iron.  If properly seasoned and cared for, the pans will last many lifetimes.  I keep a cast iron griddle for the grill.   Steaks, chops, burgers, and scallops get the best crust imaginable from the sear.

srb

Re: Cookware Recommendation
« Reply #41 on: 30 Mar 2019, 06:26 pm »
Commercial grade means it's built to stand up to some abuse.  Mine has! 
My Calphalon Commercial Non-Stick (Toledo, USA) 8"/10" frypan's coating became unusable after 5 years.

Oddly, my Simply Calphalon Non-Stick (China) 10"/12" frypans are still in service after almost 10 years.

sunnydaze

Re: Cookware Recommendation
« Reply #42 on: 30 Mar 2019, 06:38 pm »
My Calphalon Commercial Non-Stick (Toledo, USA) 8"/10" frypan's coating became unusable after 5 years.


Which is why in my earlier post I said that I'd avoid non-stick for "real" cooking: searing, browning, deglazing, sauces, boiling, warming, etc.  Non-stick not necessary for this if proper cooking techniques are employed,  and the pan is properly made and releases as it should.

For frying / sauteing certain "sticky" foods like eggs, fish, etc. I use cheapo non-stick pans, and chuck em when the surface wears.  Even the better pricey ones crap out. 

I concur with deadhead -- the surface always wears out making them disposable, and IMO it doesn't pay to spend bux on them.

TheMikeB

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 4
Re: Cookware Recommendation
« Reply #43 on: 31 Mar 2019, 11:45 am »
Here is some excellent cookware

 https://www.copperpans.com/

Photon46

Re: Cookware Recommendation
« Reply #44 on: 31 Mar 2019, 02:34 pm »
Personally, it doesn't bother me in the least that a non-stick skillet wears out in a couple years. They're a tool meant to be used and sometimes tools wear out. I've been buying ScanPans most expensive $200+ 12" non-stick skillets direct from their website during their year end / Black Friday sales for half price or less. Their best quality line lasts better than most, they're well made, and heat evenly. Analon Nouvelle Copper is another higher end non-stick cookware that heats evenly and is well made. (my comments about even heating are based on performance with our induction range.) Main thing I find that destroys non stick prematurely is not following instructions about avoiding excessively high heat. We've got several pieces of All-Clad's mid-line US made multi-ply and it is very nice, no doubt. Surprisingly, the best performing piece of cookware I have for our induction range is a very old Sears 13" straight side covered sauté pan made in Korea.

jules

Re: Cookware Recommendation
« Reply #45 on: 31 Mar 2019, 11:28 pm »
Quote
Personally, it doesn't bother me in the least that a non-stick skillet wears out in a couple years. They're a tool meant to be used and sometimes tools wear out. I've been buying ScanPans ....

Interestingly Scanware have [maybe had since I haven't tested it for 5 years or so] a "lifetime" guarantee on their non-stick pans. I have no idea why they make the offer when they must know the product won't last a lifetime but I have found they're good to their word, for at least one replacement. Used in the oven, where temp. is strictly controlled, Scan baking pans really are good for a lifetime. Even when used on gas cook tops past the point where they have lost their non-stick properties, they are quite functional. If you give them a wipe over with oil after washing and then heat dry that oil, they can develop a surface a little like an iron pan but with more even heat transfer and better conductivity. 

Sticking is only one aspect of cooking and it can be managed on pretty much any surface you like to name by careful temperature management, choice of cooking oil [or sometimes butter] and of course judicious use of tools.