Soldering Iron recommendations

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srb

Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #20 on: 29 Aug 2019, 04:29 am »
The junction has to be heated to temperature and the solder then flowed into the junction.  I don't think a fixed point solder feed mechanism will work properly in the majority of applications.

FullRangeMan

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #21 on: 29 Aug 2019, 04:54 am »
if the solder auto feed broke one can allways feed the solder manually.

mlundy57

Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #22 on: 29 Aug 2019, 05:03 am »
Different strokes for different folks. My dad preferred a gun while I prefer an iron.

FullRangeMan

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #23 on: 29 Aug 2019, 05:29 am »
It depend on the service type to be made, service with mobile parts require hands free and are a pita, especially hard wire in tube amps. Stranded wire are a easy job.
« Last Edit: 29 Aug 2019, 02:32 pm by FullRangeMan »

DeeJayBump

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #24 on: 29 Aug 2019, 06:58 pm »
For those who have used the stahl how long do the tips last versus the hakko or weller tips? Thanks.

Captainhemo

Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #25 on: 29 Aug 2019, 10:24 pm »
We've got boththe Stahl and the Hakko....  I'd buy the Hakko.
Keep the tip clean and tinned, it'll last  for  ages.

This is  a pretty accurate  review aside from the temp control... it's not   that  dificult  IMHO  LOL
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXxXA59HV-s

jay

FullRangeMan

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #26 on: 29 Aug 2019, 10:48 pm »
The tips are very cheap raw copper.

DeeJayBump

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #27 on: 30 Aug 2019, 06:57 pm »
Thanks, jay.

Yep, I had pretty much decided to go with the Hakko before asking the tip durability question, just trying to give [at least in my mind] the Stahl a fair shake. Don't want to wonder what if, and since I have many builds of danny's speakers but also some electronics, the Hakko and a tip pack it will be.

Thanks, everyone for your input.

Norman Tracy

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #28 on: 30 Aug 2019, 09:10 pm »
Good discussion guys, personally I'm a Weller user at work and home. It's what the industrial research lab used when I started in technology 40 years ago and I'm a not broke don't change guy. Agree with Mike great second choice is Hakko.

I advise considering if this tool will be used only for speaker crossovers or if it will also might be used on electronic circuit boards.

Typically the gun types and $30 pen units do not have active temperature control. The tell here is if it plugs directly into the wall and does not have a control box. These are typically called 'soldering irons' or 'soldering guns'. For example the unit DR suggested states "Tip Temperatures Of 1000 Degrees Fahrenheit Or More For Effective Heavy Duty, Sustained Soldering". That will certainly work on big old speaker wire, buss wire, inductors and leaded caps. Please do not ever get such an iron near a modern electronics printed circuit board. This type has a fixed wattage heater along with the thermal mass of the tip that supplies the heat to the parts being soldered.

The Wellers and Hakkos and similar units have active temperature control. Look for that control box with a knob or up/down buttons to set the temperature and often a digital display to show it. This class often called 'soldering stations'.  This type has a thermocouple in or near the tip that drives a feed back circuit controlling the heating element. While soldering as the work draws heat from the tip power is added to the heater. I find this very helpful on joints with a lot of copper like speaker cable because the added power quickly gets the joint to solder melting temperature so I can get on and get off. At the other use extreme when soldering on circuit boards the heating element is throttled back so the tip does not overheat delicate parts like ICs or surface mount Rs & Cs. Extreme overheating (like the 1000 degrees F from a gun type) will delaminate the copper traces off a PCB.

With my Weller I solder on PCBs with a fine tip and 650 degree F setting. For crossovers install larger flat end tip and set temp to 750F. That is with lead/tin or lead/tin/silver solders. Lead free solder needs hotter temperatures. Now such numbers are a mix of industry best practices and personal preferences. Where I work in the engineering lab we use 650, other side of the building the production staff like to turn their irons hotter 700 or above which allows them to work faster. The engineers do not like them that hot fearing component or PCB damage. In some cases in the production documentation for known sensitive parts we specify the iron temperature setting. Shops doing mil-spec or aerospace work use soldering stations with locked temperatures to prevent production staff running the irons hot.

Regarding tips for hobby work they will last years. Yes on a production floor in use 8 hrs/day spare tips are stocked. For intermittent use I do not consider the tips consumable. Like Mike said get a few sizes with the station and you are set.

Danny Richie

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #29 on: 30 Aug 2019, 10:20 pm »


Those pictures are hilarious.

Tyson

Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #30 on: 30 Aug 2019, 11:45 pm »
Clearly those are Kryptonians, hiding in plain sight.

FullRangeMan

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #31 on: 31 Aug 2019, 12:31 am »
Those pictures are hilarious.
+1. Solder a PCB is a empty table is a newbie task.

SET Man

Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #32 on: 31 Aug 2019, 03:31 am »


Those pictures are hilarious.

Hey!
 :rotflmao: Hmmm... I don't see smoke coming out from their hands. Yeah, that's where you should be holding it!

Buddy

mlundy57

Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #33 on: 31 Aug 2019, 04:00 am »
Hey!
 :rotflmao: Hmmm... I don't see smoke coming out from their hands. Yeah, that's where you should be holding it!

Buddy

Nahh, they just had a "Resist Fire" spell cast on them before soldering

jschwenker

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #34 on: 31 Aug 2019, 04:10 am »
A number of soldering iron emblazoned coffee mugs and T-shirts on the net:

"IF IT SMELLS LIKE CHICKEN, YOU'RE HOLDING IT WRONG."

FullRangeMan

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Re: Soldering Iron recommendations
« Reply #35 on: 31 Aug 2019, 04:21 am »
Solding is easy, hard is resold, especially SMD.