Evolution One review

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rustydoglim

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #40 on: 16 Dec 2018, 05:00 pm »
Most people have seen this new review already, just add it here for completeness:
https://www.hifi-advice.com/blog/review/analog-reviews/amplifier-reviews/nuprime-evolution-one/

If you find that Evolution One is too revealing (bad record is not going to sound good), match it with a DAC such as Evolution DAC (or CDP-9) that can do instantaneous sampling rate conversion that can remove harshness.

Samac

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #41 on: 16 Dec 2018, 10:22 pm »
Got them in my system and initial impressions ( 2 hours listening) highly positive but then I traveled for a week and came back to 20 inches snow here in the North Carolina mountains, just got phone and internet back, plowed out etc. Anxious to get another good listening session in (I do this when my wife is away for the day and I can crank it up). Will post detailed review in a few weeks.
Thanks for asking
Joe

That's great, Joe. That has to be exciting. Glad things are getting back to normal in the NC mountains. My Dad and brother are in Charlotte and only had to deal with some ice and rain.

You have a fantastic system, enjoy the Evo Ones. I look forward to further impressions.

Cheers,

Scott

Genez

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #42 on: 17 Dec 2018, 12:53 am »
That's great, Joe. That has to be exciting. Glad things are getting back to normal in the NC mountains. My Dad and brother are in Charlotte and only had to deal with some ice and rain.

You have a fantastic system, enjoy the Evo Ones. I look forward to further impressions.

Cheers,

Scott


Until the Evolution technology ever trickles down to a ST-10 replacement?   I will just have to adore at a distance.  Totally impractical$$$ for my audiophile desktop system.  But, it sounds like the one viable option that could budge me if it would be done.
« Last Edit: 30 Dec 2018, 12:50 am by Genez »

jmpsmash

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Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #43 on: 29 Dec 2018, 10:07 pm »
Is there anywhere I can listen to this in SF Bay Area? Either demo or audition. Thanks!

gammajo

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #44 on: 13 Jan 2019, 03:23 am »
Here is my review of the Nuprime Evolution One mono amplifiers after at least 100 hours on them.
Since I loved my Nuforce Reference 20 mono amplifiers, modded by Bob Smith, the first thing I did when I fired up the Nuprime Evolution Ones was to be sure that these new monos did nothing less well than the Reference 20's. I was pleased to still hear amazing bass (controlled, dynamic, fast, detailed and with true timbre).  And the excellent highs, mids and PRAT were still there as well.  They also were dead quiet which was a question given the new 1 million ohm input impedance and different power supply. They did seem to have more gain than the Reference 20s.

The Evos passed the "do no harm" test. What new did they bring to the table?
First noticed was the freedom from an ever so slight, unnoticeable-till-its-gone digital haze. Wow! Minor and subtle, yet highly important. Next was that the soundstage was much improved in terms of depth, separation of instruments, and air and bloom. Then I was entranced at how much more natural and beautiful high bells sounded - more rounded with more realist timbre, attack, and decay. All voices, especially female vocalists were more natural and captivating. Yet when music was supposed to be edgy it was, they could rock out with the best. When the music is relaxed and sweet, these amps allow you to be emotionally moved by liquidity and languidness ( I think because they sound less digital). This involvement could still be enjoyed at lower volumes than with other amps. They are excellent at naturally presenting the slightest micro-detail with no excessive spotlighting. Solo and massed strings were more realistically presented both in the string sound itself and the body of the instrument.

Where I found the Evos clearly better than any other amp that I have heard in any typology is with highly complex classical music such as symphonies but also complex rock and new age. Everything is more naturally delineated and more realistic sounding even when 100 diverse instruments are playing at once. In fact, I have been listening to much more symphonic music with these amps, where before there was something unsatisfying about the reproduction of such massive and detailed soundscapes. Solo instruments in these works stand out more clearly in character from the mélange of sound around them and dynamic swings are surprisingly instantaneous.

Because these amps are so transparent they act as a very clear window on your other equipment. Therefore I need to mention the rest of my system as well. I am connected with a full loom of Delphi Aerospace Ultra cables distributed by VSA, front end is the Ayon CD 35 which contains transport, DAC and NOS tubed preamp, and speakers are Von Schweikert VR55 Aktives in a 38 by 22 room.

The transparency also means that in my system at least, great recordings sound even better and poor recordings (CDs of 60's rock) are no more listenable than before except that the added slight digital haze most other amplifiers have (unless they are artificially sweet or rolled off) is not compounding the haze present on the recording itself. I like the sound of Pass Labs, Constellation, and VAC amps, yet not even considering the price, size, and heat difference, feel like I like the Evos better. They hit the sweet spot between fluidity and control. There is ample mico-detail for this detail freak and yet they present the music as a whole cloth to be enjoyed as a living presence.

Samoyed

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Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #45 on: 13 Jan 2019, 03:35 am »
Wow, I can only envy you!  Try the Evolution DAC. I love mine.

Samac

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #46 on: 13 Jan 2019, 05:11 pm »
That's great, gammajo. Excellent write-up, thanks for posting. I'm sure the Evos will get even better as you accumulate hours. Enjoy! :thumb:

Cheers,

Scott

Ric Schultz

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Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #47 on: 15 Jan 2019, 02:57 am »
It is interesting that distortion is called "digital".  A class D amp is NOT a digital amplifier.  There are no ones and zeros inside.  If a class D amp sounds less distorted, it is not because it is less "digital" or has less "digital haze".  I know these are phrases we use regularly......but even digital recording and playback is getting less and less "digital" sounding.  In fact, there are those who have dubbed 15 inch reel to reel masters to double and quad speed DSD and find they sound the same......same "analog" sound.  We need to stop thinking that "digital" means distortion and that all distortions are about reducing the "digital haze"......or for that matter "transistor sound" 

Please read up on class D.  They are analog switching amps.  There are a few amps that take the PCM digital signal and then convert it to PWM to run a switching amp output stage (I believe Tact was the first to do this)......but these amps are few and far between.

I want to acknowledge Nuprime for continuing to push class D technology to more and more refined levels.  $8000 may seem a lot to some but compared to the 574lb. each DAgostino Relentless amps ($250.000) are quite a bargain.  I hope Nuprime will look into using the new GaN devices that promise less dead time and therefore even lower distortion for class D output stages.

jmpsmash

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Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #48 on: 15 Jan 2019, 03:07 am »
class D and DSD are similar ideas. I wonder if we can somehow drive the amplification stage of a class D amp using DSD signal.

and most DACs convert to the similar single bit stream so same can be applied and feed a class D directly. I wonder how that will sound?

gammajo

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #49 on: 16 Jan 2019, 03:56 am »
Ric
I do understand that Nuprime Evos are an analogue switching amp, not a digital amp. I could have used a better term than "digital haze" in my review. What I was trying to described was a type of veiling that is additive rather than subtractive and that adds a harshness that is not present in live music and which also masks silence, timbre, and microdynamics. Perhaps it should be called electronic haze?  The haze I am talking about can be present in any class amplifier, in cables, and any type of equipment for source to speakers.

rustydoglim

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #50 on: 16 Jan 2019, 08:40 pm »
I hope Nuprime will look into using the new GaN devices that promise less dead time and therefore even lower distortion for class D output stages.

Yes, it is in R&D and I know for a fact (from device manufacturer) that we lead in the implementation of such device in switching amp. This is not surprising because of the very sad situation with high-end audio. GaN is too expensive and new for mass market use (probably 2 to 3 years out), so other than Nuprime who are still doing research with high end hybrid class D design, others simply buy from Hypex or IcePower. And we are lucky to have a very talented engineer.

Eisener Bart

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #51 on: 17 Jan 2019, 02:06 pm »
Here is my review of the Nuprime Evolution One mono amplifiers after at least 100 hours on them.
Since I loved my Nuforce Reference 20 mono amplifiers, modded by Bob Smith, the first thing I did when I fired up the Nuprime Evolution Ones was to be sure that these new monos did nothing less well than the Reference 20's. I was pleased to still hear amazing bass (controlled, dynamic, fast, detailed and with true timbre).  And the excellent highs, mids and PRAT were still there as well.  They also were dead quiet which was a question given the new 1 million ohm input impedance and different power supply. They did seem to have more gain than the Reference 20s.

The Evos passed the "do no harm" test. What new did they bring to the table?
First noticed was the freedom from an ever so slight, unnoticeable-till-its-gone digital haze. Wow! Minor and subtle, yet highly important. Next was that the soundstage was much improved in terms of depth, separation of instruments, and air and bloom. Then I was entranced at how much more natural and beautiful high bells sounded - more rounded with more realist timbre, attack, and decay. All voices, especially female vocalists were more natural and captivating. Yet when music was supposed to be edgy it was, they could rock out with the best. When the music is relaxed and sweet, these amps allow you to be emotionally moved by liquidity and languidness ( I think because they sound less digital). This involvement could still be enjoyed at lower volumes than with other amps. They are excellent at naturally presenting the slightest micro-detail with no excessive spotlighting. Solo and massed strings were more realistically presented both in the string sound itself and the body of the instrument.

Where I found the Evos clearly better than any other amp that I have heard in any typology is with highly complex classical music such as symphonies but also complex rock and new age. Everything is more naturally delineated and more realistic sounding even when 100 diverse instruments are playing at once. In fact, I have been listening to much more symphonic music with these amps, where before there was something unsatisfying about the reproduction of such massive and detailed soundscapes. Solo instruments in these works stand out more clearly in character from the mélange of sound around them and dynamic swings are surprisingly instantaneous.

Because these amps are so transparent they act as a very clear window on your other equipment. Therefore I need to mention the rest of my system as well. I am connected with a full loom of Delphi Aerospace Ultra cables distributed by VSA, front end is the Ayon CD 35 which contains transport, DAC and NOS tubed preamp, and speakers are Von Schweikert VR55 Aktives in a 38 by 22 room.

The transparency also means that in my system at least, great recordings sound even better and poor recordings (CDs of 60's rock) are no more listenable than before except that the added slight digital haze most other amplifiers have (unless they are artificially sweet or rolled off) is not compounding the haze present on the recording itself. I like the sound of Pass Labs, Constellation, and VAC amps, yet not even considering the price, size, and heat difference, feel like I like the Evos better. They hit the sweet spot between fluidity and control. There is ample mico-detail for this detail freak and yet they present the music as a whole cloth to be enjoyed as a living presence.

Good review, wishing you a lot of enjoy!

sresener

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 119
Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #52 on: 5 May 2019, 05:43 pm »
I read a few reviews that state the evolution one uses a switching power supply.

I recently watched a youtube video review by feversound (I could not understand what he was saying) But at 2:45 into his video he attempts to show us the power supply. And to me it looks like a toroidal power supply.

The web site simple says the power supply has been enhanced. Can anyone confirm what that power supply is?

sresener

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Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #53 on: 8 May 2019, 02:55 pm »

John Casler

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #54 on: 8 May 2019, 05:38 pm »
I found this nice write up of the evo one's is it accurate on the description?
https://translate.google.ca/translate?hl=en&sl=zh-TW&u=https://review.u-audio.com.tw/reviewdetail.asp%3Freviewid%3D1542&prev=search

Excerpts from review, translated:

<<<Input impedance up to 1MΩ

The first is the input stage. The Evolution One (hereafter referred to as EVO One) advertises that the newly designed input stage has an input impedance of up to 1 MΩ. What are the benefits? In general, the higher the input impedance of the amplifier, the better, so that even if the signal sent from the front end is extremely weak, the back end can be easily driven with lower distortion and phase delay. EVO One's input impedance is up to 1MΩ, making it easy to match any front-end equipment. However, the input impedance is not a big deal. If the technology is not in place, the high input impedance is likely to cause interference, and the noise of the front end is also absorbed. The result is not affected but the first one is harmed. Everyone knows the benefits of 1MΩ input impedance, but usually only the noble machine can do it. EVO One uses computer simulation when designing the input stage. It is the first Class D amplifier with 1MΩ input impedance, and it may be unique in this price band.

Then look at the EVO One class D amplifier circuit, the biggest feature is that the switching frequency of the crystal working up to 700kHz, so the sound is more round, delicate, and better resolution. What is the switching frequency of the crystal? This starts with the way D is amplified. Many people mistakenly think that Class D is a Digital (digital) amplification. In fact, Class D uses a power crystal as an amplifying component. It is still analogously amplified, but the crystal works in a fully open and closed state, so the efficiency is so high. The above 700 kHz refers to the switching frequency of the power crystal switch. Generally, the switching frequency of the class D amplifier is about 300 kHz. The higher the frequency, the more likely it is to generate heat and is unstable. However, the NuPrime pulls the switching frequency to a multiple of others, and remains stable and does not generate heat, which is the advantage of its technology. unique.

The power supply is switched to a traditional linear power supply.

The power section is also a major change. In the past, Reference 20 (hereinafter referred to as R20) used a switched power supply, and EVO One switched to a conventional linear power supply. The switching power supply has the advantages of small size and high efficiency, but the operating frequency is high, and the high-frequency noise is easily generated. The sound is not afraid of large size, not to mention the EVO One's input stage and Class D amplifier circuit is not large, the remaining space inside the chassis to accommodate a complete linear power circuit is more than enough. EVO One uses a toroidal transformer, the specifications are tailored to the requirements of EVO One, and the performance is more in line with the requirements. In addition, the toroidal transformer and the rectified current are additionally placed in a rectangular closed casing, which is completely isolated from the power supply filtering, input stage and power, etc., to prevent leakage of magnetic leakage and interference of any noise. The power supply filter is composed of a dozen filter capacitors, which can combine high speed, high capacity and low internal resistance. >>>>

mr_bill

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #55 on: 8 May 2019, 07:00 pm »
Thanks for sharing the review and it is a stellar review!

One of my favorite lines was a comment on its sound -  "clear water chicken soup" - that made me smile

gammajo

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #56 on: 8 May 2019, 07:44 pm »
sresener
Yes I think the review in its essence captures the improvement of the Evolution One over the Reference 20 and many of the Evos strengths. Need to read carefully as at least when I used Google translate there were quite a few translation errors to teh opposite of what was meant or very inexact words to describe the sound. I am still enjoying my Evolution Ones even compared to expensive other systems in all classes A, AB and D, tubed and soild state

sresener

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Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #57 on: 19 May 2019, 06:59 pm »
Pulled the trigger. Have two Evo amps and two ac4's on the way. :)
« Last Edit: 20 May 2019, 12:05 am by sresener »

Arlequen

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Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #58 on: 14 Jun 2019, 10:30 am »
Hello folks,

I'm trying for the first time in my audiophile life this Class D .. got two NuForce Reference 20 new from a local dealer.

They are sounding from a week.

My rig .. Pass Labs X1 preamp .. TW Acustic Raven One TT with Graham Phantom II and Benz Micro LP cart. .. Whest Audio PS30RDT SE phono stage

Upgraded combo Philips CDD 882 Transport with Philips DAC 960 .. Thiel CS 2.4 loudspeakers

Power Cords all Shunyata .. two Venom HC on amps and two Delta NR on pre and phono.

Cardas Golden Reference spkr. cables

Previous amp : Odyssey Audio Stratos .. than Parasound Halo JC1's .. and lately Primare A32

 

Well .. I didn't think these two R20 can feed my hungry Thiels .. and not only they work splendid they really shine!

Fantastic soundstage .. not less than JC1's and Primare .. maybe a bit tall too .. deep and super wide .. tonally neutral .. no differences from previous amps .. perhaps clearer in the mid expecially on voices ..

Since these two R20 were new from boxes I guess they 'll improve with next weeks .. so I 'll tell you about improving in sound.

Btw .. I just can say I'm investigating about the new NuPrime Evolution One .. someone says they are a step ahead the R20.

I can't imagine how good they can be!

 

My cent!
 

gammajo

Re: Evolution One review
« Reply #59 on: 14 Jun 2019, 08:33 pm »
Arlequen
Congratulation on your purchase of Ref 20, they are indeed excellent and will break in a bit more over time manifested mainly as more relaxed. And yup, the Evos are better but in a way that you will not feel you are missing anything  unless you hear them side by side, in my option having owned both and still having the Evos.