WIFI to be option for Overdrive SX top DAC

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ivanj

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Re: WIFI to be standard on Overdrive SX top DAC
« Reply #20 on: 13 Jan 2018, 02:39 pm »
There used to be a way of changing channels - it's a radio - on 2.4GHz equipment if one got interference. Not is the equipment I have circa 2016. (5GHz is banned in Canada BTW so you made a good choice and is only for indoor use in the USA!) The FTC etc. rules for the new wifi router transmitters is that "it must be designed not to interfere and must reject interference." OK.

I just put down 50' as a crossover cable because I thought that would be an extreme case. I don't know is there is an optical version but that is moot because I haven't seen optical Ethernet adapters hardwired into consumer audio.

The leakage problem you mention makes lots of sense. We always found that if you have the right bandwidth cables and they were properly made, it was the adapter that was the biggest issue. Since I am just refreshing my knowledge of your system (and Ethernet) I haven't pulled out my manuals about jitter - I don't remember it being mentioned in computer courses on networking.

I could have told you not to bother with Powerline Ethernet for audio - it does have its utility - but I'm glad you found out on your own.

Is there a website where I can get a list of your current products and how they work with ancillary equipment and software? A block diagram of the overall chain and the innards to whatever extent you unveil would be helpful! I seem to be picking up bits and pieces and I don't have the overall picture.

Thanks Steve,
William

BTW Accuphase has always used Ethernet "HD-Link and HD-Link 2" for SACD/DSD transmissions from transports to DACs and also other digital gear they make.

 http://www.accuphase.com/technical_information/dp-560_technical_information.pdf

 This is all wired:

"The biggest feature of HS-LINKVer.2 is sending the music signal and the master clock separately to D/A converter in a receiver.
HS-LINK Ver.1 sends the music signal merging the master clock together, PLL circuit for master clock recovery is needed at receiver side.
Since master clock is been transmitting as it is, in HSLINK Ver.2, not only master clock recovery is unnecessary at receiver side but it comes to be  free from the jitter at PLL circuit."

audioengr

Re: WIFI to be standard on Overdrive SX top DAC
« Reply #21 on: 13 Jan 2018, 07:21 pm »
There used to be a way of changing channels - it's a radio - on 2.4GHz equipment if one got interference. Not is the equipment I have circa 2016. (5GHz is banned in Canada BTW so you made a good choice and is only for indoor use in the USA!) The FTC etc. rules for the new wifi router transmitters is that "it must be designed not to interfere and must reject interference." OK.

I actually have both 2.4GHz and 5GHz in my media room, but my WIFI adapter only supports 2.4GHz.

Quote
I just put down 50' as a crossover cable because I thought that would be an extreme case. I don't know is there is an optical version but that is moot because I haven't seen optical Ethernet adapters hardwired into consumer audio.

A customer of mine has been using a long optical adapter with good results, but he now has my WIFI adapter.  I'm not sure he is using it yet though.

Quote
The leakage problem you mention makes lots of sense. We always found that if you have the right bandwidth cables and they were properly made, it was the adapter that was the biggest issue. Since I am just refreshing my knowledge of your system (and Ethernet) I haven't pulled out my manuals about jitter - I don't remember it being mentioned in computer courses on networking.

Good feedback.

Quote
Is there a website where I can get a list of your current products and how they work with ancillary equipment and software? A block diagram of the overall chain and the innards to whatever extent you unveil would be helpful! I seem to be picking up bits and pieces and I don't have the overall picture.

I don't actually have my Ethernet stuff on my website yet.  I just have some posts here about it.  I'll try to describe it:

My Ethernet interface is a module that can be installed in an external converter/renderer I call the "Interchange".  It looks just like my "Off-Ramp" on my webpage, except for Ethernet input, silver chassis and has the same outputs.  I can install my Ethernet module inside my DAC as well, but it interfaces with I2S bus to the D/A. The Ethernet module buffers the packets and assembles the audio stream and outputs S/PDIF serial stream and I2S bus. The module can be clocked locally with on-board oscillators, or from my external "Turboclock", which has independent regulators for each clock and is wired with two 50 ohm coaxes to the Ethernet module. The module I have now is DLNA-based, so you can play music from Jriver or Audirvana +.  It does not support Roon.

For WIFI, my solution consists of LPS (matches the DAC chassis) that powers a small WIFI to wired Ethernet adapter.  The other side of the adapter has CAT7 cable that runs to an isolator and then another CAT7 cable that connects from isolator to the DAC input.

Steve N.

brj

Re: WIFI to be standard on Overdrive SX top DAC
« Reply #22 on: 13 Jan 2018, 09:04 pm »
For your wireless or optical solutions, are you finding any performance sensitivity to the "send" side of the Ethernet link, or is it sufficient to focus on the receive side due to the packetized nature of Ethernet?

(My own system uses the TP-Link MC210CS units to provide the optical link between network switch and music server, with the "receive" side MC201CS powered by a PowerSonic SLA battery fronted by a PI Audio BatteryBUSS to drop the impedance and filter sulphation noise, and connected via a 2 foot Belden Cat 6a bonded Ethernet cable.)

audioengr

Re: WIFI to be standard on Overdrive SX top DAC
« Reply #23 on: 13 Jan 2018, 09:39 pm »
For your wireless or optical solutions, are you finding any performance sensitivity to the "send" side of the Ethernet link, or is it sufficient to focus on the receive side due to the packetized nature of Ethernet?

(My own system uses the TP-Link MC210CS units to provide the optical link between network switch and music server, with the "receive" side MC201CS powered by a PowerSonic SLA battery fronted by a PI Audio BatteryBUSS to drop the impedance and filter sulphation noise, and connected via a 2 foot Belden Cat 6a bonded Ethernet cable.)

I only have one router.  I guess I could try the wall-wart on the router instead of the LPS I am currently using...

Steve N.