Upcoming renovation which new technologies would you recommend

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Bob2

I'd run Ethernet to wherever you can, while it's easy.

+1
We recently purchased a new washer and dryer. While not requiring Ethernet access they can communicate via smartphone for diagnostic and repair service.
Probably see networked appliances in the not too distant future.
Although I can't imagine firmware updates on a refrigerator........ :o

Armaegis

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Security cameras is one of the better arguments for PoE that I've heard.

I would shy away from "smart" appliances however. The shelf life on those is not great... the more parts there are, the more potential for break down. I don't need a diagnostic app for my fridge because it has a compressor and a fan, that's it. It's not high efficiency like all the new stuff these days, but the last time it broke down it was a $20 part from the local hardware shop to get it back up again. On the flipside, my friends have a super fancy fridge with all the digital doodads. The diagnostic tools don't do you much good though, because there's literally nothing you can do to fix it as oftentimes the entire circuit board or whatever gets replaced. That was a $400 repair bill.

randytsuch

Alarm system wiring?

I would wire doors and windows with magnetic alarm sensors.

Fairly easy to do during construction, much harder to do later.

Yes, you could add wireless sensors later, but then you have to worry about batteries.
With wired sensors, you just need to make sure the wires don't get cut lol.


For electrical wiring, I would make sure neutral is available at all wall switches.  If you want to add zwave or similar later, its easier if you have neutral at the switch.


If somebody already said this, ignore.  I didn't read this entire thread.


EDIT:  Put power outlets by toilets.  Then you can add "butt washer" toilets or toilet seats if you want. 
The kids bathroom has a fancy Toto butt washer, spoiled kids lol.


Randy

ctviggen

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I agree with these two, too.  I think neutral is required for a lot of switches (such as Insteon, which I use) and when we redo our bathrooms, we would add in electrical to get a nicer toilet with bidet.  I had to add in a neutral for one of the insteon switches I wired in.  In this case, it wasn't hard to do, but a pain.  Much easier to do in the wiring stage.

I think putting tile in the kitchen is a good idea.  I know people really like wood, but our wood is ruined due to water spills.  We could probably get it resurfaced, but we made the mistake of not doing that when we moved in. We had wood installed in the upstairs, but like idiots didn't think about the downstairs.  We should have had them refinished. Now, there's too much stuff everywhere.

WGH

I shy away from new technology, everything I have owned with a LCD screen eventually has gone bonkers at one time or another (which is why I like AVA electronics).

Putting a microprocessor controlled LCD screen on a stove seems like the worst idea ever. Our parent's stove's lasted for 50 years, I can't imagine a new stove lasting that long. So I picked an "analog" stove for my kitchen remodel. True commercial ranges were out of my budget but I discovered NXR through a local dealer and after 4 years I am 100% satisfied. When I went to order the stove the sales person was rude and unhelpful so I bought online from AJ Madison for $2050 (don't forget to order the continuous center grate) with free delivery and saved on sales tax too.

Consumer Reports: A $2,000 pro-style range beats some bigger names in our tests
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2013/07/a-2-000-pro-style-range-beats-some-bigger-names-in-our-tests/index.htm
I disagree with CR reporting "it didn't provide fast cooktop heat, and baking and broiling were so-so", in my opinion the cooktop heat and baking are excellent (I don't broil).

My simple kitchen includes a real quiet 18" Bosch dishwasher (far left), black Blanco Silgranite sink and KWC faucet.


Commercial style ranges put out a lot of heat so a dual squirrel cage hood is a must, the Ancona is affordable and quiet, get a hood in the $550 price range so it has adequate CFM.

Plan ahead if you decide to go this route, you will need to install a new 3/4" gas line for all commercial style ranges.

Wayne   

kenreau

While not a new tech recommendation, this does go along with implementing it.  We purchased a 100+ year old house this past year and it had at least 2 generations of power and mechanical systems done to it over the years.  I've been fixing and replacing things, along with retrofitting a man cave dedicated home theater room.

My single recommendation would be to strip the drywall/sheet rock on walls and ceilings down to the studs to start.  This allows everyone to see the concealed conditions, locations, access paths, dry rot, problem areas, et al and your mechanical and electrical subcontractors ease of installation of what you need to replace.  Re-sheetrock and paint it all when you are done with the new in wall stuff and you'll end up with a better finished product for probably less money and faster schedule.

Best of luck
Kenreau

WGH

My single recommendation would be to strip the drywall/sheet rock on walls and ceilings down to the studs to start.  This allows everyone to see the concealed conditions, locations, access paths, dry rot, problem areas, et al and your mechanical and electrical subcontractors ease of installation of what you need to replace.

Great idea! My house was built in 1950, just 3 years before the OP's and much of the plumbing leaked inside the walls where the faucets attached. Bathtub/shower drain is new, you only get one chance to do it right before new tile goes in or it become a mess a few years later.

Figure all homes built in the 50's need a new water line to the meter, do it now or you will have a lake in your yard in less than a year (Murphy's Law).

thunderbrick

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What kenreau said!   :thumb:

nicksgem10s

Re: Upcoming renovation which new technologies would you recommend
« Reply #48 on: 17 May 2017, 01:37 am »
I am blown away with all the responses and helpful ideas.  I am going to need them.

We closed on the new house yesterday so it is official.  No turning back.

Special thanks to JLM that went way out of his way to visit the home and give me some good ideas about how to approach the management of a project this size.  JLM has wisdom way beyond audio.  I am very glad to call him a friend.

Next up is getting our current home sold quickly so I can afford to hire contractors for various projects.

I really appreciate all the great ideas.  Thank you all for putting in time and effort.  I will revisit this thread many times over the coming months.  I will need the inspiration when the going gets tough during the renovation which I know will happen at times.

My current goal is to have it move in ready by the end of August.  It will be a lot of work but I have confidence it will come together this summer.

If anyone has connections / contractor recommendations in Southeast Michigan (48304) I would love to hear them.

Windows
Drywall
Exterior/Interior Doors
Electrical
Bathroom remodeling
Swimming pool

I think the largest projects I am planning to DIY soon are going to be designing our kitchen and installing new hardwood floors for the majority of the first floor.

Thank you very much for all the help!

-Nick

jqp

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Re: Upcoming renovation which new technologies would you recommend
« Reply #49 on: 17 May 2017, 05:15 am »
Just read this thread, congratulations. i am looking to do the same kind of thing.

What comes to my mind first is ethernet cabling, like others have mentioned. It seems to be the thing that no one will help you with. Unlike a new technology washer, you can't go down to the appliance center to look at cabling options.

Who knew that Ethernet was up tp Cat 8 (almost)?

You will want the best avilable (not most expensive) - for sheilding, bandwidth, 10Gigabit. Yes 10Gig is about to become a home standard. Also 8K TVs, Robots, LCD wall art, digital networks in the home for everything - art, music, you name it. And don't forget the kitchen...

You will probably want to buy a big roll of Cat 7 for the cable runners to install, otherwise what you really want may not get put in the walls. Plenum Fire Rated.

Folsom

Re: Upcoming renovation which new technologies would you recommend
« Reply #50 on: 17 May 2017, 06:33 am »
I've seen that Home Depot sells denim insulation. It absorbs sound very well, if you want to make your home quiet, certain rooms or what not, decent R value too.

nicksgem10s

Re: Upcoming renovation which new technologies would you recommend
« Reply #51 on: 17 Oct 2017, 03:40 am »
Update for the many that shared on this thread.  I LOLed when I read my comments from May 17th that the house would be ready at the end of August.

There has been a steep learning curve and a couple of expensive lessons.

We moved our entire family in with my mom and stepdad about 6 weeks ago.  The project has become much larger than I originally anticipated.

The good news is the end is in sight and we plan to be able to call it home in another 4 weeks.

I plan to share some more details as well as some before and after photos.

I especially look forward to having JLM back for a visit once we are officially moved in.  Having seen the before in person I am guessing he will be able to truly appreciate the after.

Thanks again to all and will be sure to mention some of the helpful advice we put to work with our home.

-Nick

JLM

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Re: Upcoming renovation which new technologies would you recommend
« Reply #52 on: 17 Oct 2017, 09:51 am »
Glad you're surviving the adventure.  Yes, will be very interested to see what you've been able to come up with.  The home certainly had potential when I saw it.  Hope family counseling won't be necessary.   :)

Pihu

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Some time ago a Delsot flow heater was purchased at 7 kW. Completely worked a little normally and then, regardless of the fact that at the entrance to it, a very weak stream of very hot water flows even in the 3.5kv mode. Apparently there is something clogged in there. I tried to take out the filter that came with the filter from the inlet pipe - it did not help, so it was already clogged behind the filter (can some garbage workers forget. The question is how to clean it up. I found advice how to flush. How do you think this way will help?

ctviggen

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While not a new tech recommendation, this does go along with implementing it.  We purchased a 100+ year old house this past year and it had at least 2 generations of power and mechanical systems done to it over the years.  I've been fixing and replacing things, along with retrofitting a man cave dedicated home theater room.

My single recommendation would be to strip the drywall/sheet rock on walls and ceilings down to the studs to start.  This allows everyone to see the concealed conditions, locations, access paths, dry rot, problem areas, et al and your mechanical and electrical subcontractors ease of installation of what you need to replace.  Re-sheetrock and paint it all when you are done with the new in wall stuff and you'll end up with a better finished product for probably less money and faster schedule.

Best of luck
Kenreau

If you're going that far, seriously consider energy upgrades.  Much better/thicker insulation, thicker walls, thermal breaks, air sealing, that sort of thing.