"Ansel Adams: Photography- The Incisive Art"

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charmerci

Re: "Ansel Adams: Photography- The Incisive Art"
« Reply #20 on: 26 Jul 2017, 04:09 pm »
All of his prints were extensively "worked"...he kept "recipe cards" for each that detailed exactly what had to be done to make an approved print – dodge times, burn times, paper grade, filtration, developer, dilution...the whole shebang. It was interesting to see.


He used the Zone System of exposure and developing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zone_System

md92468

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Re: "Ansel Adams: Photography- The Incisive Art"
« Reply #21 on: 26 Jul 2017, 04:51 pm »
He used the Zone System of exposure and developing.

Yes, quite familiar with it (taught it for many years). Pre-visualizing the final print doesn't preclude having to do extensive darkroom work to get there...far from it.  Typically (and sensibly), Adams aimed to get as much information as possible on the negative so he could have the freedom to emphasize what he wanted to in the final print. The only reason you need zone system at all is because of the limited latitude of film; if he could capture all the information inherent in a scene without resorting to "placing" zones  (that is, making choices about what information would be included or not included in an exposure) or varying developer recipes, he would surely have done it.

dB Cooper

Re: "Ansel Adams: Photography- The Incisive Art"
« Reply #22 on: 26 Jul 2017, 09:37 pm »
Tip for those who've not seen his works in person and are either: not moved by them; or cannot understand the hub-bub surrounding them; or perhaps don't agree that photography should even be considered an art form - you need to see them in person. I thought/felt all of these doubts until I saw an exhibit of the originals in person. OMG. Phenomenal. Do yourself a favor and go see some - the originals, not copies.

Same holds true for Edward Weston. When I saw his retrospective in the early 80's, I was so blown away I put my (35mm) camera away for a year. The shells and peppers looked like shells and peppers in display cases, not photos of shells and peppers. Couldn't get a fraction of the quality from 35. Spent that year saving for a 4x5.