Radius must be at least 3/4" to reduce edge diffraction

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theranman

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Radius must be at least 3/4" to reduce edge diffraction
« Reply #20 on: 25 Mar 2003, 08:54 pm »
Are you talking about a regular or folded horn design? My backside consists of a folded horn design and its sound diffraction characteristcs are aided greatly by the smooth curvature of its baffle. Unfortunately, there are inherent port noise problems associated with such designs.

massappeal85

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Radius must be at least 3/4" to reduce edge diffraction
« Reply #21 on: 25 Mar 2003, 11:03 pm »
Errr, sorry. What I mean is something like eminence's h290 specifically:

http://editweb.iglou.com/eminence/eminence/pages/products02/hf/horn.htm

Flush mounted on a baffle, what would a rounded edge do?

JohnR

Radius must be at least 3/4" to reduce edge diffraction
« Reply #22 on: 31 May 2003, 12:07 pm »
The following thread may be of interest. Summary: 3/4" roundoffs do have a significant effect (for the better). Followups by PaulV also worth reading.

http://www.madisound.com/cgi-bin/discuss.cgi?read=253868

Hank

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Radius must be at least 3/4" to reduce edge diffraction
« Reply #23 on: 4 Jun 2003, 01:44 pm »
I suspected so.  And my new MLCS monster 1 1/4" roundover bit is wanting to be used.  (Jon's is begger, though - 1 1/2")

KevinW

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I agree
« Reply #24 on: 6 Jun 2003, 04:54 pm »
I have also empirically found that larger roundovers make a difference.  I built a pair of speakers with 90 degree corners (no round or bevel), and then I made some add-on roundovers that can be installed or removed in a few seconds.  The larger the radius of the roundover, the better the sound.  It is more natural, lifelike, and the imaging is better.  Without the bevels, the sound made me cringe slightly.  Especially when removing a large radius, as the change is immediately apparent.

Note, the effect is subtle, and people not used to evaluating speakers probably won't even notice it.  It is a higher order effect that can be used to extract maximum performance from a speaker.  

It has been very interesting to experiment with different radii on my speakers, and I would encourage some DIY'ers to try using different setups just to see if you can hear the change.

nathanm

Radius must be at least 3/4" to reduce edge diffraction
« Reply #25 on: 6 Jun 2003, 08:31 pm »
Would a square-finish baffle covered with an absorbent material such as foam or felt exhibit similar diffraction characteristics as a rounded baffle with just the wood?