Casting copper

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Read 765 times.

NoahH

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 309
Casting copper
« on: 27 Mar 2022, 04:12 pm »
Hi!
I know Triode will do tube connectors and it got me thinking about something a little crazy, and thought I would ask it here.

Note this is not rhetorical - I suspect there are great reasons, and I just want to learn.

Why use solder to connect wires to terminations instead of liquid copper?

On can imagine with something like a spade lug, clamping the wire and lug in a fixture, then pouring molten copper of a small measured amount into the meeting point. Copper has a high melting point, but we'll within what a blowtorch can easily do in a small crucible.

I know that is a pain, but let's face it, audio is all about extremes.

The more extreme version is that one cpuld use a mold to fully cast the collector (the tube or spade lug) in place, and stick the wire in right after the casting pour.

S Clark

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 6859
  • a riot is the language of the unheard- Dr. King
Re: Casting copper
« Reply #1 on: 27 Mar 2022, 05:36 pm »
Once, many years ago when I was teaching high school chemistry, I used a high temperature oven to melt some bronze in a ceramic crucible to cast a small item.  Probably no more than a few ounces, but then the crucible broke it immediately set the heat resistant lab table on fire... and copper melts about 250* higher than bronze. 
I'd stay away from it. 

Cheytak.408

  • Restricted
  • Posts: 145
Re: Casting copper
« Reply #2 on: 31 Mar 2022, 06:16 am »
Hi!
I know Triode will do tube connectors and it got me thinking about something a little crazy, and thought I would ask it here.

Note this is not rhetorical - I suspect there are great reasons, and I just want to learn.

Why use solder to connect wires to terminations instead of liquid copper?

On can imagine with something like a spade lug, clamping the wire and lug in a fixture, then pouring molten copper of a small measured amount into the meeting point. Copper has a high melting point, but we'll within what a blowtorch can easily do in a small crucible.

I know that is a pain, but let's face it, audio is all about extremes.

The more extreme version is that one cpuld use a mold to fully cast the collector (the tube or spade lug) in place, and stick the wire in right after the casting pour.
The best connection is a cold weld.  This uses pressure to raise local temperatures in the materials high enough to fuse the two metals.  Using a good crisper like this:

https://www.kleintools.com/catalog/combination-cutting-tools/crimping-and-cutting-tool-non-insulated-terminals

Or, for the overzealous, this:

https://www.mcmaster.com/69555K63/

The method is to crimp very quickly with high force so that the internal connector and wire temperatures are high enough to fuse.  This will produce a gas-tight connection that eliminates oxygen.

Using a high conductivity wire treatment like silver bearing paste, or better yet, graphene, will give a superior connection to solder.  The clamping pressure will purge the connection and the conductive paste will increase over all connectivity and also exclude oxygen.

Face it:  solder is metal glue, no matter what the alloy is.

Triode Pete

Re: Casting copper
« Reply #3 on: 3 Apr 2022, 11:48 pm »
Once, many years ago when I was teaching high school chemistry, I used a high temperature oven to melt some bronze in a ceramic crucible to cast a small item.  Probably no more than a few ounces, but then the crucible broke it immediately set the heat resistant lab table on fire... and copper melts about 250* higher than bronze. 
I'd stay away from it.

Yes, very dangerous and for what reason? The use of high quality Quad Eutectic solder is the way to go! Originally developed & patented by Western Electric for superior sound quality reproduction...

The best connection is a cold weld.  This uses pressure to raise local temperatures in the materials high enough to fuse the two metals.  Using a good crisper like this:

https://www.kleintools.com/catalog/combination-cutting-tools/crimping-and-cutting-tool-non-insulated-terminals

Or, for the overzealous, this:

https://www.mcmaster.com/69555K63/

The method is to crimp very quickly with high force so that the internal connector and wire temperatures are high enough to fuse.  This will produce a gas-tight connection that eliminates oxygen.

Using a high conductivity wire treatment like silver bearing paste, or better yet, graphene, will give a superior connection to solder.  The clamping pressure will purge the connection and the conductive paste will increase over all connectivity and also exclude oxygen.

Face it:  solder is metal glue, no matter what the alloy is.

Your Klein tool is a crimper, not a cold weld tool. Crimpers are relatively poor joining devices compared to to hydraulic crimpers, like the type Triode Wire Labs uses on speaker spade connections. This cold-fused / cold-welded technique provides the perfect bonded joint... see http://cardas.com/insights_cutting.php

My $0.02,
Pete

Cheytak.408

  • Restricted
  • Posts: 145
Re: Casting copper
« Reply #4 on: 4 Apr 2022, 05:17 am »
Yes, very dangerous and for what reason? The use of high quality Quad Eutectic solder is the way to go! Originally developed & patented by Western Electric for superior sound quality reproduction...

Your Klein tool is a crimper, not a cold weld tool. Crimpers are relatively poor joining devices compared to to hydraulic crimpers, like the type Triode Wire Labs uses on speaker spade connections. This cold-fused / cold-welded technique provides the perfect bonded joint... see http://cardas.com/insights_cutting.php

My $0.02,
Pete
I would never use the Klein on a spade connector.  It works well when used properly for lesser connections.  I use a dead blow hammer to get those jobs done.  I'm not personally a fan of spade connectors for speaker cables.  My preference is tightly twisted, properly treated bare wire.  Personal preference.