McIntosh XR100

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N7481E

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McIntosh XR100
« on: 28 Mar 2018, 01:11 am »
Looking for some suggestions for a sub to help with the McIntosh XR100s.  They just don't go that low.  I prefer a sub that I don't have to run high output through it. 

JLM

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Re: McIntosh XR100
« Reply #1 on: 28 Mar 2018, 11:36 am »
What's your application (audio or HT, musical genres, bass head or not)?

Please describe your room (dimensions/materials).

Have you used room correction of some sort (DSP, EQ, measuring software, treatments)?

What's your budget?

Have you considered a 'swarm' (multiple subs dispersed around the room)?  Recommend reading Floyd Toole's "Sound Reproduction" to learn how sound behaves in-room.

N7481E

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Re: McIntosh XR100
« Reply #2 on: 29 Mar 2018, 12:56 am »
My application is audio.  Listen to a mix, classic rock, not a bass head.  Really just looking for an extension down to the lower frequencies.   The XR100s only go down to about 35Hz. Most interested a more seamless set up.  I have some room treatment, not enough though.  Hardwood floor, with rug.  I have not used any room correction.  Wouldn't know where to start.  Not so concerned about budget.  I'll check out Floyd Toole's book soon.   Thanks! 

JLM

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Re: McIntosh XR100
« Reply #3 on: 29 Mar 2018, 12:02 pm »
Have you tried changing your speaker/listening position setup?  Square/cubic rooms are the some of the worst.  Non-Symmetrical layouts can help.  Disappointing that 30 drivers per 2 cabinets can't produce deep bass.

Classic rock typically doesn't go super deep, but like you am not a bass head but do believe that full bass is one of the foundations for true high fidelity sound reproduction.  I'd look for sealed sub(s) that go deep.  Not knowing much about your room/setup, suggest looking at $500 SVS SB1000, $560 Rythmik L12, or if you're into DIY using the $205 Creative Sound Solutions CSS SOX10 driver (I have one and Kerry is a good guy).  These are all high quality small sealed powered subs that go deep and can accept high or low level inputs (with the right amp on the CSS driver).

Room correction can be easy, but is always the last step to be taken after getting the proper room size/dimensional ratios, setup, and treatment right and should only be used for final tweaking.  I own and fully utilize a DSPeaker Anti-Mode 2.0 Dual Core (DAC, preamp, bass DSP) after having the "right" room, setup, and treatments in place.  (DSPeaker also sell a bass DSP only model too.)  Comes with a microphone and simple instructions, works with and without a sub.  Fancier (more complex) software based solutions work for digital sources and can correct for phase/delays. 

From Toole:  bass sound waves behave like moving your hand back and forth in a say 4 inches of water in a bathtub.  Waves travel the length, hit the end, and bounce back.  As they hit the next wave they either cancel out, double, or otherwise interfere.  Thus depending on frequency and listening location any of those things will be heard and response can produce +/- 20 dB frequency response swings.  Using multiple dispersed bass sources (subs) helps to even that all out across the room.  Note that higher frequencies behave like rays not waves, so this is a particular problem for frequencies < say 130 Hz (exact frequency is room dependent).