Eclipse

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Read 1115 times.

Zuman

Eclipse
« on: 9 Apr 2024, 05:28 pm »
I live about 20 miles south of Indianapolis and we were right in the path of "totality" for just over 4 minutes during the April 8 eclipse.
I used a Sony A1 with a 200-600mm zoom and an 18-stop filter, which I removed to get the "diamond ring" effect here (reduced resolution for posting). I also snapped a photo in our neighborhood with my iPhone to show how dark it actually got during the full eclipse.
I didn't work hard to focus on the photographic aspect because I wanted to enjoy the moment with my family and friends - I just set the camera on a tripod and snapped away with a remote without even looking at the screen. It was very cool being "in the moment" and somehow made more precious by it being so ephemeral. Having a few of photos that I took myself helps me relive it a bit, however.




« Last Edit: 9 Apr 2024, 10:21 pm by Zuman »

charmerci

Re: Eclipse
« Reply #1 on: 9 Apr 2024, 10:58 pm »
Nice! Thanks!

Zuman

Re: Eclipse
« Reply #2 on: 10 Apr 2024, 02:29 pm »
One more showing some solar prominences - the jets of plasma anchored to the sun.



Saturn94

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 1759
Re: Eclipse
« Reply #3 on: 10 Apr 2024, 10:20 pm »
Stunning!  8) :thumb:

jmc207

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 384
Re: Eclipse
« Reply #4 on: 11 Apr 2024, 06:55 pm »
Very nice. Thanks!

AllanS

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 563
Re: Eclipse
« Reply #5 on: 11 Apr 2024, 09:25 pm »
Great pics!  Thanks for sharing.  It’s great that you were able to both capture and enjoy the moment.  The youngest and I car camped in a spot along the 2017 eclipse path.  It remains as one of those vivid memories that doesn’t fade with time.

WGH

Re: Eclipse
« Reply #6 on: 12 Apr 2024, 07:56 pm »
Spaceweather.com has a video put together by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) 16th Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-16) comprised of thousands of photos of the eclipse from its fixed position above North America. When these images were stitched together, they showed the moon's shadow sweeping across the continent at 1500 mph, twice the speed of sound.

https://spaceweathergallery2.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=205389