Stabilizer vs Hockey Puck

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Herbie

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Stabilizer vs Hockey Puck
« on: 7 Apr 2010, 12:53 am »
Herbie's Audio Lab gets inquiries like this one fairly often:

"Why would the Supersonic Stabilizer be more effective than resting NHL hockey pucks on top of a component? They are non magnetic, have mass, and are covered in vulcanized rubber."

Hockey pucks are solid vulcanized rubber, not just covered with rubber. Vulcanized rubber has as much of a tendency to vibrate, reverberate, and resonate as it does to absorb vibration. In some cases hockey pucks could be beneficial as a weight on a component; more often they are detrimental. Even when they do have some benefit it's virtually always at the cost of some sonic trade-offs like high-frequency drop-off and loss of bass linearity.

Just about any material with sufficient mass that you place on a component will have an audible effect. Most materials will interfere with the music by introducing their own sonic anomalies or "signatures." Oftentimes, the heavier the mass, the more character it imposes on the music.
 
SuperSonic Stabilizers are extremely sonically neutral and highly efficient at absorbing micro-vibrations, especially the acute higher-frequency vibrations that cause glare and harshness in capacitors and other electronic parts. A blending of ferrous and non-ferrous particles in the Stabilizers also disperses some of the electromagnetic interference that is inherent in most environments.

Not a mass-loading weight, SuperSonic Stabilizer functions more like simply placing the palm of your hand on a component to absorb and reduce vibration. (Much of the vibration that adversely affects sonic qualities are micro-vibrations that you can't really feel or readily detect.)

If you're using compliant footers like Herbie's Tenderfeet or Iso-Cups and considering adding some weight on top for some additional benefit, give this a try:
 

Steve
Herbie's Audio Lab
« Last Edit: 23 Aug 2010, 01:03 am by Herbie »