Please help me decide on a Clarinet signal grounding scheme

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Bill Epstein

In the past I've run a buss between all the ground tabs on multiple RCAs. For these new plugs from the friendly guy on Taiwan, I'm thinking of using the round Cardas-style ground to wrap around each L-R pair individually, then a single wire to the board. What say you?



BTW, these are nickel-free, gold plated copper, $15.00 for 2 L-R pairs (4 pcs.). I don't like the
Cardas-style ground, but they're really well made, cheap and no yucky nickel. Vintage Audio Lab on E-Bay.
 

PatOMalley

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Re: Please help me decide on a Clarinet signal grounding scheme
« Reply #1 on: 3 Nov 2009, 11:17 pm »
don't do it. it may look cool but ganging the grounds together may get hummy.
may run back up an input.

separate ground wire for each. that is the discipline.




amandarae

Re: Please help me decide on a Clarinet signal grounding scheme
« Reply #2 on: 4 Nov 2009, 04:35 am »
Pat, why will it hum?  All those are line levels already right and isolated from the chassis?

If it was me, I'll tied all the input ground together then the two outputs on their own then connected to the same ground bus connected to the chassis or the board signal ground.  Or, you employ localize grounding assuming that it's okay if you do not mind having several wires crossing the chassis.

You can mix or match grounding schemes.  Aesthetics wise, it is simplier to follow what grounding scheme the circuit already has (PCB).

hagtech

Re: Please help me decide on a Clarinet signal grounding scheme
« Reply #3 on: 4 Nov 2009, 06:42 am »
Best to run each pair (LR) with their own return.  You'll notice on the PCB I run the grounds the entire length of the chassis and then connect at the input section.  This is the so-called "single-point" ground where the sensitive stuff gets its reference.  Wire up as if you were using the stock RCA jacks.

jh

Bill Epstein

Re: Please help me decide on a Clarinet signal grounding scheme
« Reply #4 on: 4 Nov 2009, 01:47 pm »
This is what I meant and seeing Jim's post, thank you :thumb:, that's what I've done with a ground wire from each pair to it's respective board ground.



FYI, if you try these, or Cardas jacks, be sure and place cheap male RCAs in them as heat sinks. It takes a long time with 850 degrees to make the solder flow.

harryf

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Re: Please help me decide on a Clarinet signal grounding scheme
« Reply #5 on: 6 Nov 2009, 04:59 am »
I used a single ground to one jack.Then i ran a small wire to the second.I use connecx jacks that look exactly the same as those.
No hum at all.
The problem with the clarinet is the tube rush you get over 50% volume.
I have never been able to cure that.
I'll take rush over hum any day though!

tubesforever

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Re: Please help me decide on a Clarinet signal grounding scheme
« Reply #6 on: 8 Nov 2009, 09:21 am »
Bill if you sum the grounds at the RCA chassis pieces just how is the signal going to find the shortest pathway to ground? 

You are creating the loop right at the RCA grounds!

if you get any hum from you system, try running a distinctly separate ground wire from Right and Left and connect them at the single ground point at the pcb.  This will give you the shortest pathway to ground.


YMMV and all that other stuff. 


Clean ground paths make for silent gear!

Bill Epstein

Re: Please help me decide on a Clarinet signal grounding scheme
« Reply #7 on: 8 Nov 2009, 12:17 pm »
Quote
Clean ground paths make for silent gear!

No argument, there!

Howsomever, my zero hum Cornet is  done in pairs and, as Jim points out, so are the stock RCAs.

Interestingly, just about all the high-end commercial gear I've seen including ARC, CAT and Joule Electra uses a buss tieing together all the input and all the output grounds, then to the respective board points.

Lots of ways to get it done depending on the circuit design, I imagine, so let's dance: