Speaker impedance ?

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Read 1686 times.

EV-MAN

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 45
Speaker impedance ?
« on: 18 Jan 2012, 03:30 am »
I have a Omegastar 240ex amp. The manual says it is for 8ohm. I found some nice EV Regency speakers that are 16 ohm. Will they work and if so what will be the sound difference if any. Thanks

Lefty052347

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 132
  • AVA Associate
Re: Speaker impedance ?
« Reply #1 on: 18 Jan 2012, 04:37 am »
A 16 ohm load is no problem.

My former 240 ex played down to 4 ohms without noticable loss of power.

Since it's now an Insight+ Double 240 it will drive a 2 ohm load.

Regards,
Dean

EV-MAN

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 45
Re: Speaker impedance ?
« Reply #2 on: 18 Jan 2012, 04:43 am »
Thanks Dean

avahifi

Re: Speaker impedance ?
« Reply #3 on: 18 Jan 2012, 06:58 pm »
A 16 ohm speaker demands much less from the power amp than lower impedance speakers do.  You will have no problem at all driving 16 ohm speakers with an Insight 240EX amplifier.

Frank

Æ

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 859
Re: Speaker impedance ?
« Reply #4 on: 18 Jan 2012, 07:27 pm »
A 16 ohm speaker demands much less from the power amp than lower impedance speakers do.  You will have no problem at all driving 16 ohm speakers with an Insight 240EX amplifier.

Frank


Seeking clarification.
Wayner is rebuilding an old pair of AR loudspeakers. I recommended that he replace the old capacitors with newer film capacitors of the same uF. He is insistent that replacement capacitor(s) have the same voltage rating as the original capacitors. I told him there is no reason why he cannot use higher voltage rated capacitors. Apparently he thinks that if he uses different voltage capacitors, he'll somehow mess up the crossover, shift the crossover frequency. I succinctly informed him that voltage really doesn't figure into the equation, not when doing the math for capacitive reactance.
A typical fim capacitor might be something like 250 volts, which provides a margin of safety way more than will ever be needed.
Seriously, if you have an amplifier capable of delivering 250 volts, you better worry about the tweeters blowing before worrying about any supposed shift in the crossover frequency.

avahifi

Re: Speaker impedance ?
« Reply #5 on: 18 Jan 2012, 08:59 pm »
The only issue is that I have been informed that some types of capacitors do not work at their rated value when they are operated significantly below their rated voltage. Thus using high voltage capacitors in lower voltage application may provide unanticipated results.  Probably a 100V rating is more than enough for any loudspeaker capacitor.

I can't expand on this any more than the observation above.  Perhaps some engineer who knows more about this can.

Regards,

Frank Van Alstine

Æ

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 859
Re: Speaker impedance ?
« Reply #6 on: 18 Jan 2012, 09:10 pm »
The only issue is that I have been informed that some types of capacitors do not work at their rated value when they are operated significantly below their rated voltage. Thus using high voltage capacitors in lower voltage application may provide unanticipated results.  Probably a 100V rating is more than enough for any loudspeaker capacitor.

I can't expand on this any more than the observation above.  Perhaps some engineer who knows more about this can.

Regards,

Frank Van Alstine

I already understand it well enough, no need for any engineers explanation. I merely wanted to know where Wayner came up with his information, why he made such statements.
Thank you.
Æ