Bicycling Off-Road

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low.pfile

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1220 on: 15 May 2015, 05:53 am »
Josh and DaveC.... thanks again!!  I have attempted to test ride as many bikes as I could, while not going the route of doing a DEMO ride @ $100 as I am still trying to find my size. I found it a bit odd that when I stepped up to my first road bike that the shop was adamant about sizing me on a sizing rig. I have visited no less than 8 shops on my MTB upgrade and all they ask is how tall I am. Being a bit of researcher, but less so these days, I at least know that there are many factors.

I am looking at $4000-$8000 full-suspension bikes and find it bewildering that there is so little attention to rider usage and physical ergonomics ( since my first road bike was only $1400 which had lots of attention to both)

I know my off-road riding will not be at the level of the demo videos for each bike I test rode, but I feel that the "dealers" have been very lax in their attention to customers for bikes at this level. I have had the gamut from high school graduates, to bikers/sales associates near 40yrs old.

But one of the hardest aspects to get used to, is that the bikes I am interested in are not even available to throw my leg over–even at the parking lot/back street level. you need to plan, schedule and pay for a $100 demo ride for a bike near what you are interested in.

So I've ridden all the IBIS I am interested in but the builds varied so much, even by 2 years difference that is hard to evaluate. so I have narrowed down on Santa Cruz. my last ride was on a SC Tallboy LTc. but like I mentioned. only able to ride in downtown SF and the suburbs of San Jose, CA. 



Tone Depth

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1221 on: 19 May 2015, 04:34 am »
A high tech bike shop is much rarer than high tech bikes are. When you encounter people feel comfortable with, give them your repeat business.

Josh and DaveC.... thanks again!!  I have attempted to test ride as many bikes as I could, while not going the route of doing a DEMO ride @ $100 as I am still trying to find my size. I found it a bit odd that when I stepped up to my first road bike that the shop was adamant about sizing me on a sizing rig. I have visited no less than 8 shops on my MTB upgrade and all they ask is how tall I am. Being a bit of researcher, but less so these days, I at least know that there are many factors.

I am looking at $4000-$8000 full-suspension bikes and find it bewildering that there is so little attention to rider usage and physical ergonomics ( since my first road bike was only $1400 which had lots of attention to both)

I know my off-road riding will not be at the level of the demo videos for each bike I test rode, but I feel that the "dealers" have been very lax in their attention to customers for bikes at this level. I have had the gamut from high school graduates, to bikers/sales associates near 40yrs old.

But one of the hardest aspects to get used to, is that the bikes I am interested in are not even available to throw my leg over–even at the parking lot/back street level. you need to plan, schedule and pay for a $100 demo ride for a bike near what you are interested in.

So I've ridden all the IBIS I am interested in but the builds varied so much, even by 2 years difference that is hard to evaluate. so I have narrowed down on Santa Cruz. my last ride was on a SC Tallboy LTc. but like I mentioned. only able to ride in downtown SF and the suburbs of San Jose, CA. 



DaveC113

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1222 on: 19 May 2015, 03:19 pm »
One thing about mt bikes is riding them is more dynamic and requires ever-changing body positions depending on the terrain so fit for seated pedaling isn't as important as it is on road bikes and there are simply fewer options to fine tune fit while maintaining the intended geometry of the bike. For example, on a modern trail bike stems should be in the 50-70mm range, you really should not put a longer stem on a modern suspension bike (with few exceptions), instead you need to size up on the frame. Also, you may notice that geometry for bikes has converged to the point there is much less difference in the fit/geometry of different brands, for instance my Trek Slash and my friend's SC Nomad have geometry figures that are near identical. It's important that you are comfortable on the bike and buy the right size frame but it is true the fine points of fit that are important on a road bike are more or less inconsequential on a mt bike.

Anyway, you can't go wrong today... all bikes from major mfg'ers are very good and if you pick the right bike for what you ride and that fits your riding style and get the right size frame you will end up with an awesome bike.

low.pfile

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1223 on: 24 May 2015, 04:32 am »
The maiden voyage was a tough one. 3+ hours at Skeggs Point in Woodside CA. Crazy amount of mud on all trails, only due to condensation from the cover forest as rain is non-existent in NorCal.

Amazing bike!! Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc. I would have never attempted the steep rutted rocks strewn downhills on my old hard tail 26. Dropper seat is also a god-send. And I gave out before the bike did-for sure.

no ride pics. only pulled out the camera at catch up breaks.

first shot of a rare mild section, with the heavy fog (at 11am) all around.

and a post ride pic - getting ready to wash









JoshK

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1224 on: 24 May 2015, 03:50 pm »
Sounds like you got a winner.

I agree with Dave, the good bikes now adays are all good it seems.  Just find the one you like for the riding you like.

ctviggen

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1225 on: 24 May 2015, 08:07 pm »
One thing about mt bikes is riding them is more dynamic and requires ever-changing body positions depending on the terrain so fit for seated pedaling isn't as important as it is on road bikes and there are simply fewer options to fine tune fit while maintaining the intended geometry of the bike. For example, on a modern trail bike stems should be in the 50-70mm range, you really should not put a longer stem on a modern suspension bike (with few exceptions), instead you need to size up on the frame. Also, you may notice that geometry for bikes has converged to the point there is much less difference in the fit/geometry of different brands, for instance my Trek Slash and my friend's SC Nomad have geometry figures that are near identical. It's important that you are comfortable on the bike and buy the right size frame but it is true the fine points of fit that are important on a road bike are more or less inconsequential on a mt bike.


In terms of positions during riding, I've always found this to be true, even a decade or more ago.  On my racing bike, I tended to sit in pretty much the same position for hours at a time.  The main exception was to ride out of the saddle during some steeper hills.  For the mountain bike, by contrast, I was constantly on and off the saddle, putting my foot down, moving around on the saddle, etc. All this meant the things you do to dial in your racing bike, such as change the position of your saddle, get a different saddle, change the width of the handlebars, change the length of the stem, etc., weren't nearly as important on the mountain bike.

low.pfile

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1226 on: 8 Jun 2015, 01:08 am »
I don't mean to hog the off-road thread. but I got out for another ride with a visiting friend. We rode for about 4 hours at Saratoga Gap and I was challenged to say the least with the climbing the rooted single track. but this bike is amazing. I hope to be able to control it in the near future. The pic is about one-third of the way on the 14 mile route-I didnt take any photos on the ride, just at breaks. I was riding with an Sicilian MTB racer, who is 20 years my junior. and she tolerated me. 


Odal3

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1227 on: 8 Jun 2015, 01:13 am »
I think I need to stop reading this thread because I get too jealous  :D

DaveC113

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1228 on: 8 Jun 2015, 02:45 am »
Congrats on the bike low.pfile!

I recently got a RockShox Monarch Plus rear shock for my Trek Slash after the Fox blew up, it's amazing... definitely loving my bike this season!  :green:
« Last Edit: 8 Jun 2015, 09:09 am by DaveC113 »

wgscott

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1229 on: 8 Jun 2015, 04:10 am »
My off-road bike is also an on-road bike:



(I also have a full squishy 26"-er)

wgscott

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1230 on: 8 Jun 2015, 04:15 am »
Congrats on the bike low.pfile!

I recently got a RockShox Monarch Plus rear shock for my Trek Slash after I blew the Fox, it's amazing... definitely loving my bike this season!  :green:

I just blew the Fox (so to speak) on my Trek too.   How much an improvement is this?

low.pfile

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1231 on: 8 Jun 2015, 05:23 am »
...are you guys jumping off of buildings?! I'm going to keep my weight under 190lbs and make sure my shock is set properly to prevent this sort of of blowout. I've never had a rear shock before so I am still learning!

DaveC113

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1232 on: 8 Jun 2015, 09:18 am »
I just blew the Fox (so to speak) on my Trek too.   How much an improvement is this?

Lol, umm... maybe not the most fortunate expression.  :green: 

It's a very noticeable improvement though, definitely worth it. Trek switched the Slash over to the Monarch Plus for '15 so I guess they like it too.

low.pfile, it's not a big deal... these things happen. Especially on mt bikes... if you don't have bike tools and a repair stand now's the time.  :)  Fox will probably cover it under warranty and I can keep it as a backup.

Tone Depth

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1233 on: 3 Nov 2017, 12:30 am »
Short enjoyable ride this morning in million dollar autumn desert weather:

coke

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1234 on: 7 Dec 2017, 05:31 pm »
I got a new bike this year and have really been enjoying it.  Custom titanium frame from Funk Cycles.  Has 29x3.0" tires and weighs under 20 pounds.  It's perfect for my local trails and XC races.




Samac

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1235 on: 7 Dec 2017, 07:22 pm »
Sweet bike, coke. Great pic, too. Makes me want to get out in the woods. What's sad is I haven't been out since I broke my arm when I endoed in a rock garden three years ago.

Keep posting cool pics and it might get me out there. :thumb:

Enjoy the new ride.

Cheers,

Scott

coke

Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1236 on: 7 Dec 2017, 08:24 pm »
Sweet bike, coke. Great pic, too. Makes me want to get out in the woods. What's sad is I haven't been out since I broke my arm when I endoed in a rock garden three years ago.

Keep posting cool pics and it might get me out there. :thumb:

Enjoy the new ride.

Cheers,

Scott

Thanks!  Biking is a big part of my life, and it's something my wife and I both enjoy.

Custom media blasted graphic on the bike I posted above


My other race bike


Our play bikes that are a little more comfortable and fun



The bikes we raced last year






Samac

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1237 on: 8 Dec 2017, 01:06 am »
More great pics, coke. You have a sweet stable of bikes. I really like your full squish bikes. That's what my old bones need. I ride an '09 Cannondale Rize. I might have to find a pic and post it here.

I hope you and your wife always ride. It is such an amazing activity.

Cheers,

Scott

2gumby2

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1238 on: 8 Dec 2017, 10:38 pm »
I just started looking at full suspension bikes and I'm pretty discouraged at the prices these days. I'm most interested in the Santa Cruz Tallboy ($4,800) and the Pivot 429SL ($6,700). If I went with a frameset for a build the Tallboy is $3,000 and I don't know if Pivot has a frameset available. I live in Wyoming and the nearest bike shop is two hours away if the weather is good. I may consider just sticking to road biking for a while.

DaveC113

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Re: Bicycling Off-Road
« Reply #1239 on: 8 Dec 2017, 11:14 pm »
My '14 Slash got stolen last week!  :evil:

An '18 Slash will replace it...




2gumby2, bikes are getting expensive but a mid-line build is quite good these days and there are some good direct-sale companies around with good prices. Check out Transition, YT and others. If I wasn't getting a Slash ($3700 frame!) from insurance I'd probably get a Transition Sentinel for about half the price.