Spatial Audio--SCENES Lifelike 3D audio recording headphone INTRODUCTION!

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dalethorn

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    • DaleThorn
Here's one from a link listed with the concert rehearsal posted by George.  The panning is a little distracting, but the recording doesn't have the extraneous noises of the first one, and it's a great song as well.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dP7XChShXMQ

Still pretty far from a good music recording.  The guitar sounds like it's inches away, with excellent detail but no ambiance, and the voice sounds like it's all on my left side, like an ancient stereo recording that goes for extreme separation as a sound effect.

George Jackson

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Here's one from a link listed with the concert rehearsal posted by George.  The panning is a little distracting, but the recording doesn't have the extraneous noises of the first one, and it's a great song as well.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dP7XChShXMQ

 Thanks for your explaination, the extraneous noise has nothing to do with the earphone, but related to the environment sound field at that time when you're recording with it. It aims to reproduce the 3D surround soundscape at that period, and as long as you use headphones to play back what you recorded with it, or others listen to what you shared to them, they can hear the 3D sound as well.

 Now, Scenes Lifelike 3D Headset  is officially launching on INDIEGOGO crowdfunding, and some perks have limited units. If you guys wanna purchase it, grab one now: https://igg.me/at/sceneslifelike

George Jackson

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George, I think the problem here is one of demographics. You are trying to introduce novelty to a hardcore audiophile community. Yes the concept is interesting and some of those binaural effects are neat, but you haven't produced anything that will appeal to this audience that really only cares about high quality recordings. They don't audience murmurs, sounds of footsteps, etc. They want something that makes the music better... and you haven't quite done that. We're not asking for G.R.A.S. level of performance, but until the technology has improved to the point where a wearable device can produce a good recording comparable to a pair of decent studio microphones, you may be barking up the wrong tree here.

Some more objective questions:
1) are the mics omnidirectional?
2) what is the FR curve of the mics?
3) is it a dynamic mic capsule?

4) have you considered applications like noise cancellation or perhaps selective filters to reduce ambient sound while improving vocal intelligibility?

 Yeah, perhaps the targeted group of it may not cover those who only cares the audio qaulity, but I think there would be a misunderstanding here. Using this metod to record music won't feel less high quality of what recorded by it. I know when there is something new with novelty concept is temporarily hard to be accepted , but here is the trend of audio industry coming. For years, audio has been stuck in 2D stereo, but in fact sound in the real world are three-dimensional, and you could easily tell the sound directions, distance and movement even closinfyour eyes to hear.
  If you really wanna know more about it, it happens we're officially launching it on INDIEGOGO, and you could learn more about it : https://igg.me/at/sceneslifelike. I believe it will solve your puzzles after you get to know it.

George Jackson

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Still pretty far from a good music recording.  The guitar sounds like it's inches away, with excellent detail but no ambiance, and the voice sounds like it's all on my left side, like an ancient stereo recording that goes for extreme separation as a sound effect.

 All can say is that different people have different tastes, and Lifelike 3D audio focuses the moment of that time it captures the whole surrounding soundscape as heard by ears. It aims to present the nature of sound, and it just show you the most real and immersive sound as you were standing there hearing it. Maybe it was not that kind of music that presented in this recording way, but it indeed reproduce the music in a new recording technology.

dalethorn

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    • DaleThorn
All can say is that different people have different tastes, and Lifelike 3D audio focuses the moment of that time it captures the whole surrounding soundscape as heard by ears. It aims to present the nature of sound, and it just show you the most real and immersive sound as you were standing there hearing it. Maybe it was not that kind of music that presented in this recording way, but it indeed reproduce the music in a new recording technology.

You're making a diversion.  I didn't say anything about different tastes for different folks.  What I said was that *all* commercial music has workers who take the time to clean up the irritations and distractions in the raw recordings, to make the music as enjoyable as a live concert where the audience is required to sit still and be quiet.

In this technology you present, there are no paid workers to clean up the junk in the sound, so what you have may be useful for special events and so on, but not for serious music recording and listening.

George Jackson

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You're making a diversion.  I didn't say anything about different tastes for different folks.  What I said was that *all* commercial music has workers who take the time to clean up the irritations and distractions in the raw recordings, to make the music as enjoyable as a live concert where the audience is required to sit still and be quiet.

In this technology you present, there are no paid workers to clean up the junk in the sound, so what you have may be useful for special events and so on, but not for serious music recording and listening.

  Yeah, your words are kind of pertinent. Lifelike 3D Audio recording headset mainly focus on reproducing the soundscape as it was at that time. So if you want record "serious" recording, it enables to make it too as if the recording environment is clean enough. Its recorded file can be output to be post editing and clean up the junk if you want. But it mainly makes it easier for most of normal people have access to produce their own 3D audio, to record their memory at that time.

dalethorn

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  Yeah, your words are kind of pertinent. Lifelike 3D Audio recording headset mainly focus on reproducing the soundscape as it was at that time. So if you want record "serious" recording, it enables to make it too as if the recording environment is clean enough. Its recorded file can be output to be post editing and clean up the junk if you want. But it mainly makes it easier for most of normal people have access to produce their own 3D audio, to record their memory at that time.

There are real applications, and to sell the product people will have to sell the applications.  Probably with actual "apps" that run on phones and tablets, which people carry to the places they will record.  But let's say your application is to record part of a Formula race or an airshow, you will need mics that are capable of some directionality, because the target sounds in those situations can get compromised.  Let's say you're in a big crowd at a race and you want to capture the sound of a racer coming from afar, passing close, then departing the other direction.  You want to hear the faint sounds when the racer is far away, where the crowd could make that impossible.  You need a wide dynamic range, and adjustable directionality.

If the mics are too directional, you could lose the "live" ambient effect, so you might want to be able to adjust the directionality dynamically, and/or record multiple channels so that you can "mix" them for the best combination of clarity and ambiance later on.  The extra work really pays off in the playback enjoyment factor.  Without that work, and the software features (in the app) to support it, you'll end up with a novelty product like hula hoops and pet rocks.

Letitroll98

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Still pretty far from a good music recording.  The guitar sounds like it's inches away, with excellent detail but no ambiance, and the voice sounds like it's all on my left side, like an ancient stereo recording that goes for extreme separation as a sound effect.

Ha ha, caught you Dale.  The singing voice pans to a central image and the guitar backs up if you listen to the recording all the way through.  But I almost stopped listening after the first few bars as well, that fully left panned voice is very disconcerting and only gets better further into the recording.  I think the idea with these types of recordings is very similar to old stereo demonstration discs, the microphone is walked around the stage to show you how neat the technology is rather than make a musically satisfying recording, where by definition you wouldn't notice the effect over the music.  They have a race car binaural recording on one of the Stereophile test cd's, it's virtually unlistenable.

dalethorn

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Ha ha, caught you Dale.  The singing voice pans to a central image and the guitar backs up if you listen to the recording all the way through.  But I almost stopped listening after the first few bars as well, that fully left panned voice is very disconcerting and only gets better further into the recording.  I think the idea with these types of recordings is very similar to old stereo demonstration discs, the microphone is walked around the stage to show you how neat the technology is rather than make a musically satisfying recording, where by definition you wouldn't notice the effect over the music.  They have a race car binaural recording on one of the Stereophile test cd's, it's virtually unlistenable.

Yeah, I know the simple unidirectional mics on most amateur gear are useless for this, but I suppose the more professional gear needs a skilled hand to make it work?  Dunno.  I'm just guessing there's real potential in this thing if someone develops an app that can correct for the usual problems we've read about here.

fredgarvin

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Thanks George, for the introduction of your interesting product. The comments are weird considering many of us will sit and listen for hours trying to determine which audio toy produces their favorite 'S' sound reproduction and whether another one placed that note in space 2 inches to far or too near.  :D
« Last Edit: 15 Sep 2017, 08:19 pm by fredgarvin »