BDA-3 DAC

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CanadianMaestro

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #880 on: 24 Aug 2017, 05:00 pm »
Already answered. aes/ebu = coax

Yeah, we can read that.

The document goes further by trying to explain which type of cable is better suited for certain applications, in audio as well as video arenas.

Marius

Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #881 on: 25 Aug 2017, 08:59 pm »
I stand corrected, thank you.

I would think that AES and coax have minimal grounding issues in a well designed system. But the added jitter that extra conversion steps will likely introduce is a killer.

Still, HDMI is even worse. Of which the Bda3 adds 4, replacing the better spdif and optical inputs..;/)
of course it also adds an extra superior USB ! Must organize an audition soon!
Cheers Marius

R. Daneel

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #882 on: 26 Aug 2017, 12:47 pm »
As far as I know, Bryston is using a standard HDMI switching board. It might be custom-made to their specification though but the receiver hardware is the same nonetheless. These are usually 4 input boards so that's why you have 4 HDMI inputs on the BDA-3.

I agree that BDA-3 has too few S/PDIF inputs.

As for theoretical advantages and disadvantages of different digital interfaces, their performance is highly dependent on implementation. I should also point out that optocal systems should have the best possible digital transmission but as you know, this is not always the case. Many, many years ago, Denon invested in a technology they called "optical class A". It brought the company to it's knees because it took so many years and extraordinary resources, both technical and financial, to develop it. Finally, the technology along with all the patents were sold to AT&T to save the company from going under. This is what allowed AT&T to grow so much. But that's a story for some other time.

Not all opto input receivers are created equally to say the least. Bryston is using some very fine ones. They lock immediately onto the incoming signal, they tolerate all kinds of optical cables and measured jitter is almost as low as on it's coaxial inputs. It doesn't get much better than that so there is no reason why they shouldn't be used. In all honesty, with digital TV boxes that providers usually give you, you are way better off with optical connection because when those things fail (and that is almost a certainty), you're avoiding the risk of damaging the input receiver of the DAC which would otherwise occur with coaxial connection. It has been known to happen and there are several posts about it on AC alone.

now25

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #883 on: 5 Sep 2017, 11:46 am »
Hi Folks,

In order of which connection is the best for inherent low jitter:

USB - best, then COAX (BNC or RCA), then Optical, then HDMI

james

Hi James. I understand certain manufacturers use HS-LINK ver. 2 to connect SACD transport to the DAC transmitting both clock and data signals via RJ-45. Where does this rank?

James Tanner

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #884 on: 5 Sep 2017, 12:43 pm »
Hi James. I understand certain manufacturers use HS-LINK ver. 2 to connect SACD transport to the DAC transmitting both clock and data signals via RJ-45. Where does this rank?

Sorry that's over my head - I will ask engineering.

james

alegar

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #885 on: 13 Sep 2017, 04:39 pm »
Hi James I would like to ask you a question and it is if you can change the voltage to the BDA-3 as I can buy it in Canada and it has 120 volts and the voltage of Europe is 220 volts, I hope your answer,

James Tanner

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #886 on: 13 Sep 2017, 06:07 pm »
Hi James I would like to ask you a question and it is if you can change the voltage to the BDA-3 as I can buy it in Canada and it has 120 volts and the voltage of Europe is 220 volts, I hope your answer,

No I am sorry we use specialized transformers for 100, 120, 230,and 240 Volt and 50 or 60Hz for each specific market.

james

Ola_S

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #887 on: 16 Sep 2017, 12:01 pm »
If that was the case why would you implement a transformer with double primary windings together with a layout for switching voltages?

This can easily be seen on the pictures below, six primary windings that facilitates voltages from 100 to 240v.





James Tanner

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #888 on: 16 Sep 2017, 12:31 pm »
Hi

Engineering tells me the transformer can be configured but there are  other parts changes (resistors etc.) that have to be changed as well for different power applications.

james

Ola_S

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #889 on: 16 Sep 2017, 03:30 pm »
I was not talking about resistors, I was talking about the transformers and you said that you use "specialized transformers for 100, 120, 230,and 240 Volt and 50 or 60Hz for each specific market". This doesn't seem to be the case and is something one would expect considering the relative low production volumes. The Bryston products I have personally check are all very easy to convert (sometimes a new mains switch is required etc. but no big deal). 

I have converted a couple of Pass amplifiers back in the days, also dead simple.

James Tanner

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #890 on: 16 Sep 2017, 04:52 pm »
I was not talking about resistors, I was talking about the transformers and you said that you use "specialized transformers for 100, 120, 230,and 240 Volt and 50 or 60Hz for each specific market". This doesn't seem to be the case and is something one would expect considering the relative low production volumes. The Bryston products I have personally check are all very easy to convert (sometimes a new mains switch is required etc. but no big deal). 

I have converted a couple of Pass amplifiers back in the days, also dead simple.

Ok thats fine if you feel confident doing that but it is not something I can recommend. There are so many safety and certifications required these days that even making a small alteration to a certified product is frowned upon by the agencies involved.

james

Ola_S

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #891 on: 16 Sep 2017, 05:01 pm »
I fully agree! :)

BSC

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #892 on: 16 Sep 2017, 09:21 pm »
 Anybody who has been dealing with buying high end knows the context of buying products from abroad. Almost always there is a huge price difference from say buying an American product from America than buying it from a dealer in the UK via official means. That leads to problems not least for suppliers and dealers who want to keep the profit chain intact. It's tricky and as such a lot of companies try to protect the system by ensuring that it is not easy and any conversion is done on legitimate terms-I had a friend who imported a Krell amp here in the UK but found it wouldn't work even with a transformer-the internal software looked for the correct frequency before it would run-he ended up having to pay a Krell dealer to get it to work.

Coming on and asking the manufacturer a question as blatant as just has been asked it's a tad naughty as the person well knows.

gbaby

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #893 on: 17 Sep 2017, 04:02 pm »
Anybody who has been dealing with buying high end knows the context of buying products from abroad. Almost always there is a huge pricer to get it to work.

Coming on and asking the manufacturer a question as blatant as just has been asked it's a tad naughty as the person well knows.

Its enough to make a manufacturer representative not to want to participate in these forums.  :(

The Rang

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #894 on: 23 Sep 2017, 02:46 am »
Forgive me if this has been asked before.
It's not a complaint, just a question.

Bryston's amps (and I believe their speakers too) have a 20 year warranty, amazing
Digital products are 5 years.
I can understand the shorter warranty with CD players, they are mechanical devices with drives and/or lasers than can wear out or become obsolete.
But that's not the case with DACs yet they they have the same 5 year warranty.
What is the reason for that?

James Tanner

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #895 on: 23 Sep 2017, 11:26 am »
Forgive me if this has been asked before.
It's not a complaint, just a question.

Bryston's amps (and I believe their speakers too) have a 20 year warranty, amazing
Digital products are 5 years.
I can understand the shorter warranty with CD players, they are mechanical devices with drives and/or lasers than can wear out or become obsolete.
But that's not the case with DACs yet they they have the same 5 year warranty.
What is the reason for that?

Hi Rang

Its just because Digital chips and parts change so much and very quickly over time that we had concerns that certain parts would no longer be available in the long term.  So we had to put a reasonable time frame on our ability to service a specific product.

With the analog amplifiers most of the parts if they do change can be retro fitted easily with newer parts so long term repair is more doable. 

With speakers we manufacture all our own drivers, crossovers and cabinets so the ability to offer long warranties is possible because we can control the quality of every part and can retrofit long term.

Hope this helps.

james

CanadianMaestro

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #896 on: 23 Sep 2017, 12:22 pm »
Hi Rang

Its just because Digital chips and parts change so much and very quickly over time that we had concerns that certain parts would no longer be available in the long term.  So we had to put a reasonable time frame on our ability to service a specific product.

Hope this helps.

james

So if a chip or any other part in my 5+ yr-old BDA-1 fails , and the exact part is no longer available, what would be Bryston's solution when I send it in to factory? Would I get any replacement parts installed?

Thanks.

James Tanner

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #897 on: 23 Sep 2017, 01:33 pm »
So if a chip or any other part in my 5+ yr-old BDA-1 fails , and the exact part is no longer available, what would be Bryston's solution when I send it in to factory? Would I get any replacement parts installed?

Thanks.
 

Hi

It would have to be dealt with at the time based on what parts were available. 

Fortunately we have been building digital products for a while now and so far making sure we choose quality parts in the design stages has the benefit of long term reliability.

james

The Rang

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #898 on: 23 Sep 2017, 03:35 pm »
Thanks James, that does help and makes sense.
If a drive/laser by Sony or Philips or whomever becomes obsolete a chip can do the same.
I get that it would be easier to sub in a different cap or something in an amp rather than a chip the whole unit is designed around.
There are stories out there about some manufacturers keeping a spare laser for every player they produce, just in case (who knows if this is actually true)
Do you keep a healthy inventory of these types of part, for the future?

James Tanner

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Re: BDA-3 DAC
« Reply #899 on: 23 Sep 2017, 04:00 pm »
Thanks James, that does help and makes sense.
If a drive/laser by Sony or Philips or whomever becomes obsolete a chip can do the same.
I get that it would be easier to sub in a different cap or something in an amp rather than a chip the whole unit is designed around.
There are stories out there about some manufacturers keeping a spare laser for every player they produce, just in case (who knows if this is actually true)
Do you keep a healthy inventory of these types of part, for the future?

Hi

We certainly try and also we look at when new chips come out are they 'pin to pin' compatible - which makes repair or replacement much easier to manage.

james